Momotidae

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Momotidae

[mə′mäd·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The motmots, a family of colorful New World birds in the order Coraciiformes.

Momotidae

 

(motmots), a family of birds of the order Coraciiformes. Body length, 17–47 cm. The edges of the bill are serrated. The tail is graduated; the shafts of the middle rectrices are bare at the top (the birds pluck the feathers themselves). The plumage is green, with light blue, black, and red spots. There are eight species, distributed in the tropical forests of Central and South America. Motmots nest in burrows (up to 1.8 m deep) dug in cliffs or level ground. There are three or four eggs in a clutch; both parents incubate for 21 or 22 days. The young leave the nest in 28 to 31 days. Motmots feed on insects and fruits.

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Exhibit Species Deep Papuan (Blyth's) hornbill (Rliyticeros Forest (a) plicatus) Free Bali mynah (Leucopsar rothschildi) Flight (a) Black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) Blue-crowned motmot (Momotus momota) Blue-grey tanager (Thraupis episcopus) Crested wood partridge (Rollulus roulroul) Golden-breasted starling (Cosmopsarus regius) Green-naped pheasant pigeon (Otidiphaps nobilis) Inca tern (Larosterna inca) Nicobar pigeon (Caloenas nicobarica) Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias) Forest Bourke's parrot (Neophema bourkii), Edge Nicobar pigeon (Caloenas nicobarica) Mountain Blue-faced honeyeater (Entomyzon Clearing (a) cyanotis) Laughing kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) Masked lapwing (Vanellus miles) Propagation Bali mynah (Leucopsar rothschildi).
Respiratory trematodiasis is reported rarely in birds, although blue-crowned motmots (Momotus momota) appear overrepresented in published (1,2) and anecdotal reports (J.
Because of the high representation of blue-crowned motmots with air sac trematodiasis in reported cases, 2 blue-crowned motmots were sedated by isoflurane administered by facemask and endotracheal intubation for exploratory laparoscopy to identify adult trematodes, in addition to the previously described diagnostic methods.
Several avian species involved in this case management were managed cooperatively via Species Survival Plans of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and were recommended to produce offspring for transfer to other institutions, including the Bali mynahs, blue-crowned motmots, black-necked stilts, blue-crowned laughing thrush, blue-grey tanagers, lesser green broadbills, white-headed buffalo weavers, Cape thick-knee, fairy bluebirds, golden-breasted starlings, laughing kookaburra, Micronesian kingfishers, red-billed leothrix, green-naped pheasant pigeons, and sunbittern.
Blue-crowned motmots remained persistently infected at other institutions despite several different treatment modalities.
Based on overrepresentation of blue-crowned motmots in reported cases, additional treatment options were investigated.
The correspondence between climatic cooling at more northerly latitudes and the retreat of todies, motmots, and many other kinds of birds historically more widespread to the tropics suggests that the current distribution of many tropical species may be the result, at least in part, of an inability to adapt to cooler environmental conditions.
Predatory behaviour of young turquoise-browed motmots, Eumomota superciliosa.
JUST IMAGINE IF, INSTEAD OF WORKING IN AN OFFICE WITH other people, you reported to work every day with beluga whales, bonnet-head sharks, blue-crowned motmots, and poison-dart frogs.
Frogmouths Batrachostomidae; Owlet Nightjars; Potoos; Eared Nightjars; Nightjars; Treeswifts; Swifts; Hummingbirds; Trogons; Kingfishers Alcedinidae; Kingfishers Dacebridae; Kingfishers Cerylidae; Todies; Motmots; Bee Eaters; Rollers; Ground Rollers; Cuckoo Rollers; Hoopoes; Woodhoopoes; Hornbills; Ground Horbills; Jacamars; Puffbirds; Asian Barbets; African Barbets; Amercian Barbets; Honeyguides; Toucans; Wood- peckers; New Zealand Wrens; Pittas; Broadbills; False Sunbirds; Woodcreepers; Furnarids; Antbirds; Antthrushes; Gnateaters.
Potential avian predators seen in the area of the transects included several species of motmots Momotidae), puffbirds (Bucconidae), kiskadees (Tyrannidae), cuckoos (Cuculidae), and various antbirds (Formicariidae) and raptors.
If no head, as represented by eyes or a constriction in the shape, is present, naive loggerhead shrikes and motmots attack an end.