motte-and-bailey


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motte-and-bailey

A motte that is adjacent to, or surrounded by a bailey; the open area within a medieval fortification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, Barbara English's essay, "Towns, Mottes and Ring-works of the Conquest," which attempts to show that all of William the Conqueror's pre-Hastings castles were ring-works and not motte-and-bailey castles, is based on no archaeological or historical sources other than her conjectures.
A motte-and-bailey castle was built around 1093, a mile away from the present castle, around the time of the town's founding by Norman baron Roger de Montgomery.
Shotwick Castle is brilliant, too - you can see the motte-and-bailey where the castle would have stood.
The property also boasts former service quarters, a motte-and-bailey (a type of raised, enclosed castle), a listed ornate garden and 17 acres of woodland.
While many of the motte-and-bailey earth castles were abandoned, the stone castles grew more numerous.
'He wasn't Welsh, but much of his finest work, both in terms of composing and writing about music, was completed in Wales.' The home boasts former service quarters, a motte-and-bailey and a listed ornate garden with 17-acres of woodland.