mound

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mound,

prehistoric earthwork erected as a memorial or landmark over a burial place, a defensive embankment, or a site for ceremonial or religious rites or other functions. Such structures are found in many parts of the world, but the name is applied in particular to those of North America, ascribed to a people known as Mound BuildersMound Builders,
in North American archaeology, name given to those people who built mounds in a large area from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Mississippi River to the Appalachian Mts.
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. Sometimes the term is also applied to heaps of community refuse, as in shell moundshell mound,
in archaeology, a mound consisting largely of the shells of edible mollusks. It is a kind of kitchen midden found in various parts of the world.
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mound

[mau̇nd]
(geology)
A low, isolated, rounded natural hill, usually of earth. Also known as tuft.
A structure built by fossil colonial organisms.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mound

1. a small natural hill
2. Archaeol another word for barrow
3. an artificial ridge of earth, stone, etc., as used for defence
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the 193 historic locations (Thorne 1989) 36 of the sites contained mounds, 117 had no mounding activity, and 40 sites could not be located due to errors in the reported projections.
The least values of SOC, N, P, K, Ca and Mg contents recorded for compacted furrows was attributable to removal of organic matter from surface soil during mounding or ridging which left less fertile subsoil on the surface in addition to erosion and leaching.
Similar research has not been conducted in mountain ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest, where the mounding activities of the western pocket gopher (Thomomys mazama) are conspicuous in natural meadows and other forest openings (Verts and Carraway, 2000).
Construction of continuous high mounds (on stick-raked areas) greatly reduced soil loss risks, suggesting that (if mounds are to be constructed) the duration between stick raking and mounding should be minimised.