mountain effect

mountain effect

[′mau̇nt·ən i‚fekt]
(electromagnetism)
The effect of rough terrain on radio-wave propagation, causing reflections that produce errors in radio direction-finder indications.

mountain effect

An error in a radio direction finder caused by radio waves being reflected from the surface of a mountain, which may cause a direction-finding needle to fluctuate or give erroneous readings. The error is predominant when an aircraft is flying over mountains.
References in periodicals archive ?
He just called it the Black Mountain effect, where daffodils grown above 1,000 feet produce a lot more galantamine than daffodils grown anywhere else."
He just called it the Black Mountain effect where daffodils grown above 1,000 feet produce a lot more galantamine than daffodils grown anywhere else."
These indicated that the vegetation distribution was affected by the mountain effect. The highest vegetation coverage zone is the elevation of 4200-4400 m, where it is at the foot of the mountain with gentle slope.
With greater confidence and reduced risk, deployed units can ship repair parts using a better mix of surface and airlift assets to reduce the iron mountain effect. Using JLAT reports, high-cost, lightweight items or high-technology items can be shipped by air throughout the deployment and low-cost, heavyweight items can be economically shipped by surface transportation.
First, the winds at altitude were relatively calm so there was no mountain effect to generate strong down and up drafts.
Thank you for a great cover story on Brokeback Mountain ["The Brokeback Mountain Effect," February 28].
We might call Idaho's belief in vineyard altitude "the magic mountain effect."