mountain mahogany


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

mountain mahogany

[′mau̇nt·ən mə′häg·ə·nē]
(geology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Mountain mahogany was the most common shrub in pinyon-juniper and oak-mountain mahogany habitats, comprising 4.9% and 14.1% of total cover, respectively.
There are no trails in Bridge Creek Wilderness, where the steep terrain is covered with a mixture of lodgepole pine, white fir and mountain mahogany. Orientation skills are a must.
Consider planting one of these drought to lerant trees: American plum (Prunus americana), bristlecone pine, burr oak (Quercus macrocarpa), cockspur thorn (Crataegus crus-galli), curl-leaf mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus ledifolius), Gambell oak, common hackberry (Celtis occidentalis), pinon pine, ponderosa pine (Montana's state tree), and upright junipers.
Western yew -- Taxus brevifolia -- is also called Pacific yew and mountain mahogany. These yews can grow as tall as 75 feet.
This is riverside habitat at its most verdant, where Arizona sycamore, ash, alder, walnut, cottonwood, and willow jostle for sipping rights alongside grape, manzanita, silk tassel, scrub oak, mountain mahogany, and a kaleidoscope of water-loving wildflowers.
The semi-desert land is home to pinyon pines and Utah junipers, ravens and jays, desert bighorns and coyotes, canyon wrens and collared lizards, mountain mahogany and mountain lions.
It has white fir, ponderosa pine, and the world's largest sweet-smelling mountain mahogany. It feeds Indian paintbrush, Douglas fir, pentstemon, mule deer, bobcat, bat, and mountain lion.
More to their liking: rock slides up where short summers and heavy snows put a lid on canopy growth but where patches of ceanothus and mountain mahogany and bitterbrush deliver both forage and bedding cover, where islands of conifers stop the wind and offer concealment that no high-priced binocular can compromise.