mucosa

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Related to mucosae: mucosal

mucosa

[myü′kō·sə]
(histology)
A mucous membrane.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) The mean L*, a*, and b* were used as the L*a*b* values representative of the atrophic and nonatrophic mucosae in each image.
mucosae x-4w-1, originally isolated from piglet feces, have been demonstrated to possess antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, antibiotic resistances to doxycycline, lincomycin, oxytetracycline, and streptomycin, and interleukin (IL)-6 induction ability in RAW 267.4 macrophages (M.
The mucosae were put in 10% neutral formalin solution for 1 day and prepared into 5-7 m thick paraffin sections which were subjected to hematoxylin- eosin staining.
A total 20 cases were obtained, and the original H&E-stained slides were reviewed to ensure that columnar-lined mucosa (lamina propria and muscularis mucosae) was present.
The most significant change has been understanding the structure of oral mucosa at the molecular as well as cellular or tissue levels, which has revealed a host of unsuspected functions, as well as commonalities in structure and function with other mucosae.
Lipoid proteinosis, which is also known in the literature as Urbach- Wiethe disease and hyalinosis cutis et mucosae, is a rare autosomal-recessive anomaly that primarily affects children.
The digestive system presented four layers: mucosae, submucosae, muscular and serosa.
OSMF was first described by Schwartz (1952) which he originally termed as "atrophia idiopathica (tropica) mucosae oris" [5] Later in 1953, Joshi from Mumbai re-designated he condition as oral submucous fibrosis.
Endoscopic mucosal resection specimens of Barrett mucosa have an anatomic peculiarity, that is, a double muscularis mucosae. This was first reported in 1981 by Kato et al, (12) from Japan, where the incidence of Barrett mucosa is small.
(11-18) In patients with allergic rhinitis, increased iNOS expression caused by the release of proinflammatory cytokines in the upper and lower respiratory tract mucosae has emerged as a possible cause of increased NO levels.
In this article, we describe five cases of clinical cicatricial pemphigoid that featured otorhinolaryngologic manifestations-that is, all patients exhibited involvement of the oral, nasal, and ocular mucosae. Three of these patients had laryngeal lesions, one of whom had severe lesions that led to stenosis that necessitated a tracheostomy.