mudsill


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mudsill

[′məd‚sil]
(civil engineering)
The lowest sill of a structure, usually embedded in the earth.

groundsill, ground beam, ground plate, mudsill, sole plate

In a framed structure, the sill which is nearest the ground or on the ground; used to distribute concentrated loads.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hold-downs, strap and tension ties, mudsill and truss anchors, header caps, and rafter clips--among a variety of products for framing connections--provide the continuous load path necessary to properly transfer uplift forces and horizontal loads during high winds and earthquakes.
Hairline cracks where stucco meets the mudsill are likely in a quake, but they're not necessarily a problem.
The board between the house and the foundation is called the mudsill.
Place them 4 feet apart on center and within 12 inches of the end of any mudsill section.
Even bolted, a mudsill is of little use if the studs that rest on it are simply nailed into place.
Cody plays in a swampy blues band called The Mudsills, I write a lot of twangy honky-tonk, and Mike has played in just about every kind of band under the sun.
Constantly attempting to hold a large black population to the mudsills of society, the south had perfected the system of keeping blacks in their place.
Traditionally, the bay houses were built on mudsills, which rested on the marshland and allowed owners to move their bay houses when the marshland eroded.
Truth be told, and you can ask any woman you meet in the saloon, it's the mudsills with the biggest mouths and the biggest guns who usually turn out to be the little willies.
Up from the mudsills of hell; the Farmers' Alliance, populism, and progressive agriculture in Tennessee, 1870-1915.
The Lincolns lived a hard life but were not mudsills, nor even really Southerners.
The use of treated lumber for the construction of mudsills, baller boards, and artwork were also equal (2.