mudslinging

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mudslinging

casting malicious slurs on an opponent, esp in politics
References in periodicals archive ?
Mudslinger looked poised to collect the handicap hurdle coming to the last but a mistake at the flight handed the initiative to the Philip Enrightridden De La Rue who prevailed by a neck.
DARRELL HAIR was a mudslinger who tried to blackmail cricket's governing body into paying him off, a tribunal heard.
The umpire who controversially awarded a Test match victory when a team refused to take the field was a mudslinger who tried to blackmail cricket's governing body into paying him off, a tribunal heard yesterday.
Meanwhile, the mudslinger's use of anonymous sources has put the journalist's "privilege" to protect sources in a new light.
(21) One advantage to using surrogates--particularly surrogates who were not yet prominent party members--was that they could raise character issues about other candidates without making their own candidate look like a mudslinger. (22) Abraham Lincoln, a surrogate debater on behalf of the Whig candidates in the elections of 1836, 1840, and 1844, freely attacked the Democrats for their jibes against Zachary Taylor.
Much of Brock's book deals with skulduggery at the Scaife-funded American Spectator--a magazine for which Bawer was a movie critic for several years prior to Brock's own stint there as, he now confesses, a hired mudslinger and fabricator of slanders against Anita Hill, President Clinton and others.
[27] The results demonstrate that when managers perceive the opponent as a mudslinger and believe that the media are focusing excessively on mudslinging, turnout declines.
JONESY: Her prick husband, a mudslinger, took her from East Boston, which is a fuckin' tough ghetto, let me tell you, and left her in Baltimore.
In her statement, Victoria refuses to breach confidences about her marriage, avoiding the trap of being branded a mudslinger.
"Mississippi senator Theodore Bilbo was a piece of work," Mitchell writes about this early twentieth-century mudslinger.
Alter calls this latter technique "phony objectivity," by which "if you say Bush is a mudslinger then you have to say that Dukakis is a mudslinger.
As I would hate to be called a mudslinger. I will not use the true name of the company, but there is a product on the market that exemplifies this.