mugwort


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mugwort

mugwort

multiple varieties Sharp spikey leaves, hairless on top but have soft white wooly hair underneath. 3 ft stem (1m) sometimes purplish. Small greenish yellow cottony looking flowers on spikes. Leaves are edible, somewhat bitter (good for digestion, stomach acid, bile production, gas, bloating, nutrient absorption, liver). Used for centuries as an antibacterial, antifungal, worm-expeller, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, stimulant, stomach aid, and blood cleanser. Tea used to hide pain, headaches, promote sweating, regulates menses, lowers blood sugar, rheumatism, colds, bronchitis, epilepsy, colic, kidneys, nerves, shaking, stomach aches, asthma, insomnia, menstrual issues, tumors, stop bleeding, diarrhea, . Leaves contain compounds shown to be effective against staph and strep infections, dysentery, E.Coli, etc. Tea also used as insecticide, and externally for skin conditions like poison ivy. Used in past as flavoring for beer-like drinks before hops were used. Do not take while pregnant. Not advisable for children.

Mugwort

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Artemissia vulgaris is a common plant throughout northern and southern temperate zones. It is named for Artemis, the Greek goddess whose shrines were often centers for

healing. Mugwort is used for easing the pain of childbirth, for many women's disorders, and for epilepsy and hysteria. Witches and folk doctors have, for centuries, regarded it as a magical healing herb. As a tea, it is used to aid divination and general psychic work; stuffed into pillows, it dispels nightmares and promotes divinitary dreams.

In France and Germany it is gathered on St. John's Eve, consequently being referred to there as St. John's Plant, and is thought to protect corn from mice. Some modern Wiccans use the tea as a bath for consecrating crystals, amulets, and talismans. Some even use it as a ritual drink at full moon esbats. But in Normandy, it is traditionally used to prevent witches from spoiling butter.

Mugwort

 

(Artemisia vulgaris), a perennial herbaceous plant of the family Compositae. The usually dark red-brown stems are 30–200 cm tall. The twice- or thrice-pinnatisect leaves are 3–15 cm long and 2.5–20 cm wide; they are broadly ovate or elliptical, white-tomentose beneath, with small auricles at the base. The lower leaves are on petioles; the upper ones are sessile and smaller than the upper ones. The obovate or elliptical heads measure 2–3 mm across and are gathered into a dense panicle. All the flowers are tubular and reddish. The marginal flowers are pistillate, and the middle ones are bisexual. The mugwort is found in forests and steppes in Europe and Western Asia. It grows as a weed along roads and river banks, in wastelands and dumps, amid shrubbery, and—less commonly—in forest glades and margins. In the USSR the plant occurs in the European portion, the Caucasus, Western Siberia, and Middle Asia. Mugwort contains an essential oil, carotene, and ascorbic acid; the apices of the flowering plants and roots are used in folk medicine.

References in periodicals archive ?
S leaves Damiana Uncertain Dry the leaves Horehound Very common Dry the leaves Mint(s) Common in wild and Dry the leaves gardens Manzanita Widespread in west Dry the leaves and southwest Mugwort Widespread along Dry the leaves streams Mullein Widespread in fields Dry the first year leaves Passionflower Widespread vine in Dry the leaves leaf west and south Sage(s) Widespread in Dry the leaves gardens and in wild Yerba santa Widespread Dry the leaves throughout the west Willow Widespread along Dry the young bark, streams worldwide shred it.
Secondly, to clarify the blood pressure effects of the salt and mugwort used in flavoring goat meat soup, the blood pressre of rats fed on a diet of goat meat containing 3% to 4% sodium chloride, and goat meat containing 3% to 4% sodium chloride and 5% mugwort was compared to the blood pressure of rats fed on a diet of goat meat contained 0.
Other names to conjure with include Sticky Mouse-ear, Wurzell's Mugwort, and Scarlet Pimpernel.
The test checks susceptibility to 12 allergens including pollens (stinging nettle pollen, mugwort pollen, hazel pollen, birch pollen and grass pollen), airborne fungus, dog and cat epithelia, mould and plant fungi, latex and airborne fungus and covers almost 90% of the main allergies suffered in the UK.
Behind us is a boneyard of empty kegs and the old barn where Hunt concocts his brews, including some flavored with mugwort and wild bergamot instead of hops.
5kg white bread flour; 2 pints of buttermilk; 40g salt; 32g bicarbonate of soda; handful of oats; mix of fresh seaweeds and/or wild garlic leaves; mugwort or wild fennel method?
Mix of fresh seaweeds and/or wild garlic leaves, mugwort or wild fennel Method Preheat your oven to 180C/Gas Mark 4.
The critters have clever monikers (like Eartha Cat, Harry Elephante and Rudi Rabbit) and are crafted from organically grown cotton filled with organic flax and herbs including chamomile, mugwort, echinacea, lavender, lemon balm and hops.
From the Middle Ages onwards the plant, whose folk names include Golden Buttons and Mugwort, has been used as a remedy for various conditions, from fevers to rheumatism.
Unlike modern beers that are flavored with flowers of the hop plant, the Eberdingen-Hochdorf brew probably contained spices such as mugwort, carrot seeds or henbane, in Stika's opinion.
Apart from barley, malt and wild yeast, Iron Age beer contained mugwort and carrot seed, plus stinking nightshade to increase alcohol content.