Mulch

(redirected from mulching)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to mulching: composting

mulch,

any material, usually organic, that is spread on the ground to protect the soil and the roots of plants from the effects of soil crusting, erosion, or freezing; it is also used to retard the growth of weeds. A mulch may be made of materials such as straw, sawdust, grass clippings, peat moss, leaves, or paper. For large areas under cultivation a tilled layer of soil serves the purpose of a mulch.

Mulch

A layer of material such as wood chips, straw, and/or leaves, placed around plants to hold moisture, prevent weed growth, and enrich or sterilize the soil.

Mulch

 

a cover made of straw, reeds, and other longstemmed plants. A mulch is used to protect plants in greenhouses from cold temperatures at night; in very cold weather it is also used during the day. Mulches are made with a hand-operated tool or by a matting machine.


Mulch

 

a complete or interrow covering (as of mulch paper, crumbled peat, pulverized manure, humus, compost, or fallen leaves) on the soil. Mulching materials are used in agriculture in the cultivation of vegetables, fruits, berries, ornamentals, and other crops. Mulch reduces labor expenditures on interrow tilling and improves plant-growing conditions and soil fertility by conserving soil moisture, reducing the amplitude of soil temperature fluctuation, protecting the soil surface against scouring, preventing the formation of a soil crust, and preventing weed growth. As a rule, mulch increases the harvest of agricultural crops, particularly in arid regions. It is less effective on heavy and overly moist soils, on which it may even reduce the harvest.

The stubble of cereal grasses left on the fields for the winter plays the same role as mulch by protecting the soil against erosion. This procedure is of particular importance in the steppe regions of the USSR, where strong winds often prevail (Altai and Krasnoiarsk krais, Novosibirsk and Omsk oblasts, the northern part of the Kazakh SSR).

REFERENCES

Plodovodstvo, 2nd ed. [Edited by V. A. Kolesnikov.] Moscow, 1966. Pages 261–63.
Rubtsov, M. I., and V. P. Matveev. Ovoshchevodstvo. Moscow, 1970. Pages 181–82.

mulch

[məlch]
(materials)
A mixture of organic material, such as straw, peat moss, or leaves, that is spread over soil to prevent evaporation, maintain an even soil temperature, prevent erosion, control weeds, and enrich soil.

mulch

Material such as leaves, hay, straw, or the like, spread over the surface of the ground to protect the roots of newly planted shrubs or trees, of tender plants, etc., from the sun or from the cold.
References in periodicals archive ?
Weed occurrence under trash mulching wi th different nitrogen levels at NSCRI farm Thatta during
"Our results showed that an offset bale unroller can make mulching of vegetable crops more efficient.
The following organic materials were used for mulching: chopped wheat straw, regularly cut grass from grass-plots, sawdust of different tree species, and medium decomposed fen peat.
It has been proved that municipal wastes are considered as one of the effective mulching material in horticultural crop production (Tariq et al., 2012).
Excess leaves left over from mulching can be used as a "brown" layer in your compost pile.
The best way to deal with this is to scatter a compound fertiliser like Growmore through the flower beds and borders before mulching.
Integrating solarization and mulching did not have much overall impact on the insect community, compared to solarization alone, but it did lead to recovery of Collembola populations later in the season to similar levels found in mulched plots.
A: Use the same depth and application technique as for mulching on the ground.
During periods of drought, such as we have experienced the last few summers, I would recommend mulching to a depth of at least 4", but any depth is better than none at all.
Mulching might be an effective control method for other invasive woody species as well.
If it is too deep, or if the wrong material is used, mulching can cause significant harm to trees and shrubs and other garden plants.
For example, John Deere's L100 Lawn Tractor features a five-speed, gear-drive transmission; an 18-inch turning radius; and the EDGE Cutting System, which features a 42-inch mower deck that converts from mulching to bagging to side discharge.