mule skinner

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mule skinner

[′myül ‚skin·ər]
(mining engineering)
A mule driver.
References in classic literature ?
A pack of ragged Portuguese muleteers crowded around us, offering their beasts at half a dollar an hour--more rascality to the stranger, for the market price is sixteen cents.
The donkeys all stood still after the catastrophe and waited for their dismembered saddles to be patched up and put on by the noisy muleteers. Blucher was pretty angry and wanted to swear, but every time he opened his mouth his animal did so also and let off a series of brays that drowned all other sounds.
We arrived home again finally, after a ten-mile excursion, and the irrepressible muleteers scampered at our heels through the main street, goading the donkeys, shouting the everlasting "Sekki-yah," and singing "John Brown's Body" in ruinous English.
When we were dismounted and it came to settling, the shouting and jawing and swearing and quarreling among the muleteers and with us was nearly deafening.
One of them is that the enlisted men were mainly peasants and farmers, most of whom were illiterate at the time, and those who could read and write were more intent on survival after the war than on writing down an account of their muleteer days.
The muleteer in I, 3 goes to get water for his animals: "The muleteer cared nothing for these words [of admonishment by don Quijote]--and it would have been better for him if he had, because it meant caring for his health and well being" (32).
The shirt was ripped from his back as a muleteer stepped forward and laid on fifty lashes, reducing his flesh to pulp.
The island has recently seen visitor numbers swell, reaching 800,000 each year and injecting AU$1.2billion (520million [pounds sterling]) into the Australian economy; Above: a German woman, travelling with a muleteer from Zanjan to Tabriz, Iran, 1891; Above right: a traveller looks out from the Shwedagon Pagoda, Burma (Myanmar), 1900-10.
'El redentor mal parido' shows a muleteer who is often reduced to the level of his animals, even sexually on one occasion when drunk.
(I, 47; 500) Think of how different this would be if the narrator had merely announced that a young muleteer started singing "Marinero soy de amor." Instead, everyone here is all ears, except the plaintive, initially disembodied voice that comes to those ears.
Barrabas, a muleteer who expresses scorn for high-faluting music directed at Costanza, also takes umbrage when he misinterprets a song as possibly referring to the clothing of the working class guests at the Inn, exclaiming, "Hermano musico, mire lo que canta y no moteje a nadie de mal vestido, porque aqui no hay nadie con trapos y cada uno se viste como Dios le ayuda" (207).
As part of Company 32, he soon finds himself in France in the Winter of 1939, working as a muleteer helping to supply the British Expeditionary Force.