multipotent cell

multipotent cell

[¦məl·tə‚pōt·ent ′sel]
(embryology)
A cell capable of giving rise to only a limited number of cell types.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research paper, "Discovery of a stem-like multipotent cell fate," has been published in the American Journal of Stem Cells.
SAN DIEGO, Calif., July 25, 2017 -- Histogen, Inc., announced that its proprietary multipotent cell conditioned media will be marketed by biopharmaceutical company Allergan within the recently-acquired Regenica Advanced Rejuvenation System.
Dechesne et al., "Transplantation of a multipotent cell population from human adipose tissue induces dystrophin expression in the immunocompetent mdx mouse," The Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol.
ISCO will be working to complete the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) pharmacology and safety studies, including tumorigenicity, toxicology and tolerability, using the human parthenogenetic neural stem cell (hPNSC) product, a type of self-renewing multipotent cell that is a precursor for the major cells of the central nervous system.
Stem Cells based on their cell potency and differentiation are divided into unipotent cells, multipotent cells, pluripotent cells and totipotent cells (Figure 1).
Isolation and characterization of multipotent cells from human fetal dermis.
These self-renewing and multipotent cells were present in both fetal and adult human bone marrow tissues and could be derived from iPSCs.
TSCs are multipotent cells that can differentiate into large, multinucleated syncytia, resembling syncytiotrophoblast cells of the placenta.
Mesenchymal stem cells are multipotent cells that possess self-renewal capacity.
There are several postulated mechanisms described for the metaplastic transformation of multipotent cells of normal endometrial stroma.
Generally, the exogenous multipotent cells are obtained from numerous connective tissues including adipose tissues, bones, and cartilages; expanded in an appropriate cell culture system in vitro; and intravenously delivered into the bodies or injected into skeletal tissues.
According to Huo et al., cells that, when stimulated with growth factors, are able to differentiate into odontoblasts are dermal multipotent cells (DMS) [48].