muriatic acid


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muriatic acid:

see hydrogen chloridehydrogen chloride,
chemical compound, HCl, a colorless, poisonous gas with an unpleasant, acrid odor. It is very soluble in water and readily soluble in alcohol and ether. It fumes in moist air. It is not flammable, and the liquid is a poor conductor of electricity.
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muriatic acid

[myu̇r·ē′ad·ik ′as·əd]
(inorganic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
Labels on the containers said they contained muriatic acid, also called hydrochloric acid, which can cause permanent vision damage and severe burns if allowed to remain on eyes or skin.
Its identity as muriatic acid was verified at the University of Virginia and at Yale (42).
For example, muriatic acid is available for use in swimming pools in retail stores, but was not used in Project L.
A similar look can be achieved with a light wash of muriatic acid after the concrete has cured or by sandblasting a cured surface.
Nursing a rum and coke, Tracy stepped over four large cartons of muriatic acid.
Products Commonly Found in Clan Labs [*] Commercial Products Chemicals Hazards Battery Acid Sulfuric Acid Corrosive Acid Drain Cleaner Camera Batteries Lithium Water Reactive Coleman Fuel Petroleum Distillates Flammable Kerosene Lacquer Thinner Mineral Spirits Denatured Alcohol Mixture of Alcohols Flammable Epsom Salts Magnesium Sulfate Nonhazardous Heet Methyl Alcohol Flammable Iodine Crystals Iodine Irritant 7 percent Tincture of Iodine Muriatic Acid Hydrochloric Acid Corrosive Acid Nonprescription Cold Medicine Ephedrine/Pseudoephedrine Nonhazardous Red Devil Lye Sodium Hydroxide Corrosive Base Road Flares Red Phosphorous Flammable Starting Fluid Ethyl Ether Explosive/Flammable (*.
Rubber, for example, offers considerable resistance to abrasion and chemicals, including most inorganic salts, alkalies and some organic chemicals, even muriatic acid.
It is sold at most hardware stores under the name muriatic acid, and costs only a dollar or so for a quart.
Sulfuric acid, muriatic acid, lime arsenated soda, and dyes were used by textile companies and dumped into the waterways.
To aid adherence, floors were first etched with muriatic acid.
Key to successful application of a basement wall waterproofer is preparation of the wall, which usually involves brushing with a metal brush, and applying a coat of muriatic acid.