muscarine


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

muscarine

[′məs·kə‚rēn]
(organic chemistry)
C8H19NO3 A quaternary ammonium compound, the toxic ingredient of certain mushrooms, as Amanita muscaria. Also known as hydroxycholine.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1914) The action of certain esters and ethers of choline, and their relation to muscarine. J.
Discovered in 1869, muscarine was the first compound isolated from the Amanita muscaria mushroom, from which the compound derives its name.
In larger doses, muscarine produces blurred vision, sweating, lowered blood pressure, slow heartbeat, stomach pain, and breathing difficulty.
In addition to glutamate, various other neurotransmitter systems were implicated in the neurotoxicology of mercury: muscarine and nicotine receptors (Bondy & Agrawal, 1980; Castoldi, Candura, Costa, Manzo, & Costa, 1996), nitric oxide (Kuo, Huang, & Lin-Shiau, 2002) serotoninergic (Hrdina, Peters, & Singhal, 1976), noradrenergic (Komulainen & Tuomisto, 1981; Gasso, Sunol, Sanfeliu, Rodriguez-Farre, & Cristofol, 2000) and dopaminergic (Bondy & Agrawal; Komulainen & Tuomisto; Scheuhammer & Cherian, 1985; Faro et al., 1997, 2002; Dare et al., 2003) systems.
(1,6) Muscarinic receptors are acetylcholine-binding receptors that have historically been demonstrated to be activated by muscarine and blocked by atropine.