Muteness


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Related to Muteness: Apraxia of Speech

Muteness

Elops
dumb serpent; gives no warning of its approach. [Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
Henry
bald-headed, pugnosed and silent youngster of comic strip. [Comics: Sheridan, 200]
Painted Bird, The
Kosinski novel about a foundling boy struck dumb by inhuman treatment. [Am. Lit.: Weiss, 345]
Singer, Mr.
mute whose disability restricts his social contacts. [Am. Lit.: Carson McCullers The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter in Magill II, 416]
References in periodicals archive ?
Smart environments are environments of miscommunication oriented toward muteness.
For the officials at the asylum in Vienna, his only "symptom" is his muteness.
Elisabet's muteness, in turn, can be thought of as a form of fearless silence', silence as protest, willfully pursued against doctor's orders and against the demands that the public places on the great actress.
Drawing on Winnicott's theories of being alone and Nancy's poetic conjuring of what it feels like to fall asleep, we hear in Dorothy's and William's writing what Jacobus calls "the audible sounds of life" in even the quietest moments of solitude or muteness (117).
There is a sense of stillness in many of these writings that one does not find in the expression of other major subjects for poetry, such as love or the ending of love, and the poems collected in Time of Grief seem to each display a sort of cognitive muteness.
From the monstrosity of the top commanders to the muteness of the many who must have seen, heard, known or suspected - the facts must be faced and learned from.
Hardin, "Middleton, Plautus, and the Ethics of Comedy" (296-311); Meredith Molly Hand, "More lies than true tales': Scepticism in Middleton's Mock-Almanacs" (312-29); Heidi Brayman Hackel, "Staging Muteness in Middleton" (330-45); Stephen Guy-Bray, "Middleton's Language Machine" (346-59); David Glimp, "Middleton and the Theatre of Emergency" (360-75); Indira Ghose, "Middleton and the Culture of Courtesy" (376-89); Gabriel Gbadamosi, "Playwright to Playwright: The Changeling" (390-403); Barbara Fuchs, "Middleton and Spain" (404-17); Ewan Fernie, "Wisdom in Reverse" (418-36); Lars Engle, "Middleton and Mimetic Desire" (437-51); Celia R.
Most importantly is the muteness of the first few minutes.
Back in college, Yuknavitch and her classmates were assigned Sigmund Freud's 1905 case study of "Dora," a bisexual 18-year-old who spent years fending off sexual advances by a family friend--and manifested her trauma through spates of muteness and coughing fits.
During these sessions, the child's expressions gradually increased in both content and creativity, reducing their muteness.
It is an idea that has been provocatively raised by Barbara Johnson, who in her reading of Jane Campion's The Piano (1993) argues that muteness can represent "a form of resistance and subject-hood" (1998, 143).
liberated from its (allegedly self-imposed) muteness by the narrator,