muzzle

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muzzle

1. the projecting part of the face, usually the jaws and nose, of animals such as the dog and horse
2. a guard or strap fitted over an animal's nose and jaws to prevent it biting or eating

muzzle

[′məz·əl]
(ordnance)
The end of the barrel of a gun from which the bullet or projectile emerges.
(vertebrate zoology)
The snout of an animal, as a dog or horse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kaplan has another situation in which muzzles prove useful: "Some dogs who tend to eat inedible objects (rocks, peach pits, balls) and end up needing foreign body surgeries often wear basket muzzles for years whenever they are outside or on walks to prevent them from eating indiscriminately."
Note: While veterinarians often use "sleeve" muzzles, these are not recommended, as they inhibit your dog's ability to pant and take treats, and they can be very stressful for dogs.
Amid the rise of critical netizens in the social media, the Philippine National Police (PNP) has no more plan to tape the muzzle of the service firearms of its armed personnel similar to what its past leaderships have been doing in the past.
The .22 WMR loading carries a 40-grain JHP bullet, and its factory-rated muzzle velocity is 1,910 fps.
"Unlike traditional muzzles, the Baskerville Ultra is uniquely designed to allow dogs to eat, drink, pant and play while wearing their muzzle," said Bianca Rossi, head of Marketing, Americas.
One thing I didn't do during the class was cut the 11-degree chamfer on the muzzle.
But making dogs wear muzzles can mislead people into thinking that certain breeds of dogs are dangerous," said Chae Il-taek, an official from the Korea Animal Welfare Association.
Unfortunately we have tried muzzles but because of his breed they don't fit!
The top police officer in Northern Mindanao has ordered policemen not to seal their firearms' muzzles during the Christmas and New Year celebrations, in an attempt to promote responsible gun use.
YESTERDAY'S story about a Japanese Akita attacking a dog walker raised the issue of muzzles being used for dogs in public places.
Unlike other muzzles, while wearing the patented Baskerville Ultra Muzzle dogs can comfortably pant, drink and even be fed.