mycelium

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mycelium

the vegetative body of fungi: a mass of branching filaments (hyphae) that spread throughout the nutrient substratum

Mycelium

 

the vegetative body of a fungus; it consists of fine (1.5–10 microns in diameter), branched filaments (hyphae). It develops within a substrate or, less frequently, on its surface. The mycelium may be noncellular (Phycomycetes) or multicellular (Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes, and Fungi Imperfecti). The mycelium cells of Phycomycetes, Ascomycetes, and Fungi Imperfecti are always haploid. In Basidiomycetes the primary mycelium that develops from spores is haploid; further in its development it becomes diploid owing to its merging with the mycelium of the other sex (heterothallism) or the convergence of the nuclei in the anastomosing cells (homothallism). Vegetative reproduction of fungi is accomplished by fragments of the mycelium.

mycelium

[mī′sē·lē·əm]
(biology)
A mass of filaments, or hyphae, composing the vegetative body of many fungi and some bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frozen mycelia and garlic cloves were used to extract genomic DNA by the boiling method (Holmes and Quigley, 1981); 2-4mg of mycelium or 80-120mg of non-infected garlic tissue were transferred into an Eppendorf tube containing 200mg of glass beads of 500[micro]m in diameter and 150[micro]l TE (Tris-Base 50mM, EDTA 2mM), vor texed for 2min, boiled for 5min and vortexed for 1min.
erinaceus mycelia via submerged fermentation under constantly controlled culture parameters.
By the use of a visible spectrophotometer (Shimadzu, UV-2450, Japan), the reducing sugar content in mycelia was measured as described by Su et al.
The significance of the differences among treated samples was evaluated using the least significant difference (LSD) test for multiple comparisons of the means of the growth diameter of mycelia. Each experiment has three replicates.
Some isolates showed no reproductive structures (8%) and were identified as Mycelia sterilia (25% of morphospecies).
The nutritional content present in a particular medium or substrate used can greatly affect the growth of mycelia. An evaluation of the suitability of a certain medium is necessary to reflect the efficiency of mushroom growth.
To obtain asexual structures of the pathogen: mycelia disks (5 mm diameter) taken from the margins of the isolate colony, in modified carrot-agar medium-CA (RIBEIRO, 1978) cultivated at 25[degrees]C under alternate regime of light for three days, and were transferred to Petri dishes containing KNO3 0.01 M solution (ERWIN; RIBEIRO, 1996).
The aerobic reactions were carried out using pre-grown mycelia as a direct tyrosinase source.
Next, collect moist, rotting mulch that's laced with white fungal mycelia. You can obtain this mulch from any decomposing wood material that has white strands visible on its dark, moist side.