mycelium

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mycelium

the vegetative body of fungi: a mass of branching filaments (hyphae) that spread throughout the nutrient substratum

Mycelium

 

the vegetative body of a fungus; it consists of fine (1.5–10 microns in diameter), branched filaments (hyphae). It develops within a substrate or, less frequently, on its surface. The mycelium may be noncellular (Phycomycetes) or multicellular (Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes, and Fungi Imperfecti). The mycelium cells of Phycomycetes, Ascomycetes, and Fungi Imperfecti are always haploid. In Basidiomycetes the primary mycelium that develops from spores is haploid; further in its development it becomes diploid owing to its merging with the mycelium of the other sex (heterothallism) or the convergence of the nuclei in the anastomosing cells (homothallism). Vegetative reproduction of fungi is accomplished by fragments of the mycelium.

mycelium

[mī′sē·lē·əm]
(biology)
A mass of filaments, or hyphae, composing the vegetative body of many fungi and some bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of different nitrogen containing compounds (sodium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, casein hydrolysate and calcium nitrate) as a nitrogen source was observed on the mycelial growth of different strains of S.
The isolates were grown using minimum cultivation technique, in which mycelial fragments of the isolates were placed on a disk of Malt Extract 2% over a microscope slide, containing sterilized soil and sand at 1:1 and covered with cover glass, promoting an environment favorable for development and sporulation of Fusarium sp.
The mycelial growth inhibition in all treatments in relation to the control at different yeast cell concentrations can be seen in Table 1.
In addition to the reduction in mycelial diameter, the addition of CPT at 100 ug/mL also resulted in a change in mycelial morphology of R.
Mycelial Compatibility and Pathogenic Diversity Among Sclerotium rolfsii Isolates in the Southern United States.
Effect of antagonistic fungi on mycelial growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in vitro: One mycelial discs 5 mm in diameter from 7 days old culture of antagonistic fungi (Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma hamatum, Clonostachys rosea, and Coniothyrium minitans) were placed in facing 5 mm disc of S.
Daily and average measures of Dreschlera tritici-repentis mycelial growth (mm) under action of tough lovegrass leaf or root extracts and significance (*) in relation to positive (fungicide) or negative (DMSO 1%) control Incubation day Treatments DMSO 1% Fungicide Leaves Roots 1[degrees] 2,60 A 0,00 A 2,40 A 3,80 A 2[degrees] 40,75 A 0,00 C 28,15 B 40,75 A 3[degrees] 49,40 A 0,00 C 34,80 B 52,40 A 4[degrees] 57,05 A 0,00 C 39,20 B 58,75 A 5[degrees] 63,75 A 0,00 C 42,30 B 65,65 A 6[degrees] 78,00 A 0,00 C 45,35 B 70,90 A Average 48,59 A 0,00 C 32,03 B 48,70 A C.
Corn grit decoction gelatin (CDG) of three varieties of corn; sweet corn (SCDG), glutinous corn (GCDG) and yellow corn (YCDG) were used as the culture media for the mycelial growth of three Pleurotus species.
For round-fluffy mycelial development, the culture was grown on potato dextrose agar (PDA), pHo 5.
The colony morphology of the Trichoderma on PDA without NaCl or boron shows mycelial hyaline growth, cottony aspect, with green or yellow peripheral sporogenous areas, depending on the isolate.