mycetoma

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Related to mycetomas: Eumycetoma

mycetoma

[‚mī·sə′tō·mə]
(medicine)
A chronic fungus or bacterial infection, usually of the feet, resulting in swelling. Also known as madura foot; maduromycosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mycetoma is a chronic indolent, slowly progressive granulomatous infection which eventually causes bone destruction.
The former include the sinus fungus ball (once called mycetoma or aspergilloma) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis which typically affect immunocompetent subjects.
The noninvasive forms are fungal ball ("Sinus mycetoma") and allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS).
nov., a new pathogen isolated from human mycetomas. J Clin Microbiol.
Five hundred and seventeen various clinical specimens such as sputum of patients with suspected tuberculosis, sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), cutaneous and subcutaneous abscesses, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), dental abscess, mycetoma, wound, bone marrow biopsy, gastric lavage and tracheal aspirate were collected from February 28, 2011 to March 8, 2013 (Table 1).
Mycetoma or Madura foot is an insidious chronic granulomatous inflammatory disease affecting the subcutaneous tissues.
The non-invasive group can be further divided into allergic fungal sinusitis and fungal balls (mycetomas).
Previous studies have shown that Aspergillus is the most common agent in fungal sinusitis, mycetomas lodge most frequently in the maxillary sinuses (15-17).
No fue posible realizar la diagnosis a nivel de especie debido a la falta de equipo para realizar la diseccion de los ejemplares para la cuantificacion y disposicion de las glandulas salivares, mycetomas y ciegos del buche asi como el sistema reproductivo.
Fungus balls (eg, mycetomas, and urobezoars) can extend down the ureter as casts within the collecting system (seen as the "cat's tail sign"), and this can result in mechanical obstruction.
Mycetomas represent the most common form of fungal sinusitis, and they are more common in women than in men.
apiospermum infections occur worldwide, ranging from localized mycetomas to deep-seated disease such as cerebral abscesses (6, 7).