myoelectric prosthesis


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Related to myoelectric prosthesis: prosthetic device

myoelectric prosthesis

[‚mī·ō·i‚lek·trik präs′thē·səs]
(medicine)
A replacement device for lost limbs that uses the electromyographic activity of a contracting muscle as a control signal; it is most commonly used for below-elbow amputees in whom elbow function is retained.
References in periodicals archive ?
They all have varying degrees of experience in the use of either a cosmetic prosthesis or a myoelectric prosthesis in their daily life.
Stubblefield, "The use of targeted muscle reinnervation for improved myoelectric prosthesis control in a bilateral shoulder disarticulation amputee," Prosthetics and Orthotics International, vol.
The present study shows that the M is effective in improving the functional ability and in easing the social interaction of previous active users of a myoelectric prosthesis.
The Southampton Hand: An intelligent myoelectric prosthesis. J Rehabil Res Dev.
The comparison of psychological and social adaptation below elbow amputation men using a mechanical and myoelectric prosthesis by using of TAPES questionnaire.
The user characteristics that were used for the minimization procedure were age, sex, prosthetic side (dominant vs nondominant), prosthetic level, and years fitted with myoelectric prosthesis. Because hand dominance is unknown in ULRD, right-sided absence was considered as dominant side for this group.
Note that P2 and P6 are the participants who did not use their myoelectric prosthesis much during the day.
This may be a factor of the subject being an experienced body-powered prosthetic user as his first device versus the more recently fitted TMR myoelectric prosthesis. There was slight variability in the test results; of the three trials of the modified test, the time to move the 16 blocks for each trial was 38, 25, and 25 s with the body-powered prosthesis and 60, 52, and 56 s with the myoelectric prosthesis.
In Vietnam war veterans with unilateral upper-limb loss, only 8 have received a myoelectric prosthesis. The majority received mechanical (body-powered) prostheses.
To confirm that the inertial properties of the prosthetic arm were different from a nondisabled limb, we measured the mass, center of mass, and moment of inertia (pendulum method) of a typical body-powered prosthesis (stainless steel hook) and myoelectric prosthesis and compared these values with tabulated values for the forearm and hand of a 180 lb male with forearm length that matched the forearm length of the prosthesis [11].
This approach can be incorporated into the customary occupational therapy for myoelectric prosthesis fittings [7].
A second procedure 6 weeks later consolidated the residual limb and he was fitted with a myoelectric prosthesis.