myoelectric prosthesis


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Related to myoelectric prosthesis: prosthetic device

myoelectric prosthesis

[‚mī·ō·i‚lek·trik präs′thē·səs]
(medicine)
A replacement device for lost limbs that uses the electromyographic activity of a contracting muscle as a control signal; it is most commonly used for below-elbow amputees in whom elbow function is retained.
References in periodicals archive ?
Preliminary functional assessment of a multigrasp myoelectric prosthesis.
On the functional limitation in below elbow amputation men using Mechanical and Myoelectric prosthesis via TAPES questionnaire.
The comparison of psychological and social adaptation below elbow amputation men using a mechanical and myoelectric prosthesis by using of TAPES questionnaire.
The user characteristics that were used for the minimization procedure were age, sex, prosthetic side (dominant vs nondominant), prosthetic level, and years fitted with myoelectric prosthesis.
Note that P2 and P6 are the participants who did not use their myoelectric prosthesis much during the day.
Since P2 and P6 were the two participants who did not use the myoelectric prosthesis much during the week, gaze behavior might be related more to the duration of use rather than to the functional abilities.
Prosthetic myoelectric fitting began 7 mo postsurgery, and the final TMR myoelectric prosthesis was dispensed within 2 mo (Table 1), with four-site muscle control for elbow flexion (lateral biceps), elbow extension (medial triceps), hand close (medial biceps), and hand open (lateral triceps).
With the standard Box and Blocks test, 53 and 46 blocks were moved using the body-powered prosthesis and 21 and 19 blocks with the myoelectric prosthesis for each of two trials.
To confirm that the inertial properties of the prosthetic arm were different from a nondisabled limb, we measured the mass, center of mass, and moment of inertia (pendulum method) of a typical body-powered prosthesis (stainless steel hook) and myoelectric prosthesis and compared these values with tabulated values for the forearm and hand of a 180 lb male with forearm length that matched the forearm length of the prosthesis [11].
This approach can be incorporated into the customary occupational therapy for myoelectric prosthesis fittings [7].
For an amputee with shoulder disarticulation, an interim myoelectric prosthesis may not provide optimal control and function because the pectoral muscles are paralyzed and cannot be used as myosites until reinnervation occurs.
A second procedure 6 weeks later consolidated the residual limb and he was fitted with a myoelectric prosthesis.