myrtle oil

myrtle oil

[′mərd·əl ‚ȯil]
(materials)
Light-yellow liquid distilled from the flowers and leaves of the European myrtle (Myrtus communis); aromatic aroma; formerly used in medicine; now used for flavors and as perfume fixative.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemical composition of Turkish myrtle oil. Journal of Essential Oil Research, 12: 541-544.
The chemical composition of Spanish myrtle oils. Part II.
The myrtle oil MyB was slightly more active, compared to MyHN and MyK, probably as a consequence of their different chemical composition.
Hydration & Anti-Inflammation: Inhibit inflammation, microbial invasion and dryness with Australian Myrtle Oil and Bisabolol (derived from German Chamomile), both offering hydrating, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial properties to soothe redness, heal blemishes and plump the skin.
A diluted myrtle oil massaged into these areas can work wonders and give a pleasant warm feeling.
The myrtle oil is used for itching, hair fall, dandruff, nourishing the hair roots, and the inflammations of urinary tract.
A gently fragranced moisturising cleanser with antibacterial plant extracts such as aloe vera, witch hazel and lemon myrtle oil, it also doubles as a pre-shave softener.
Results have shown that lemon myrtle oil is has superior antimicrobial activity than tea tree oil.
Naomi has an insulin pump fitted to her stomach for her diabetes, and when the area where the needle goes into her stomach became infected, Ann rubbed the lemon myrtle oil in and it cleared up.
Lemon myrtle oil has been noted to exhibit even higher antibacterial and antifungal activities than Melaleuca (tea tree) oils (20).
"The students were bitten all over - but the arms covered in Bog Myrtle oil remained bite- free.
The antifungal evaluating showed that myrtle oil exhibited good antifungal activity against fungi.