ACID

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Related to n-6 fatty acid: Omega-6 fatty acids

acid

1. any substance that dissociates in water to yield a sour corrosive solution containing hydrogen ions, having a pH of less than 7, and turning litmus red
2. a slang name for LSD
3. Chem
a. of, derived from, or containing acid
b. being or having the properties of an acid
4. (of rain, snow, etc.) containing pollutant acids in solution
5. (of igneous rocks) having a silica content of more than 60% of the total and containing at least one tenth quartz
6. Metallurgy of or made by a process in which the furnace or converter is lined with an acid material

What does it mean when you dream about acid?

Can refer to something eating away at one’s insides. Alternatively, maybe an idea, a relationship, or a product is going through the “acid test.” Might also allude to an “acid tongue.”

acid

[′as·əd]
(chemistry)
Any of a class of chemical compounds whose aqueous solutions turn blue litmus paper red, react with and dissolve certain metals to form salts, and react with bases to form salts.
A compound capable of transferring a hydrogen ion in solution.
A substance that ionizes in solution to yield the positive ion of the solvent.
A molecule or ion that combines with another molecule or ion by forming a covalent bond with two electrons from the other species.

ACID

(programming)
A mnemonic for the properties a transaction should have to satisfy the Object Management Group Transaction Service specifications. A transaction should be Atomic, its result should be Consistent, Isolated (independent of other transactions) and Durable (its effect should be permanent).

The Transaction Service specifications which part of the Object Services, an adjunct to the CORBA specifications.

ACID

(Atomic, Consistent, Isolated, Durable) The properties of a transaction in a well-designed database management system (DBMS). The transaction must be ATOMIC (all updating tasks must be completed or nothing is done), CONSISTENT (it cannot leave the database in a state that violates any integrity rules), ISOLATED (remain invisible to other operations until completed) and DURABLE (will complete or be reversed if the system fails in the interim).
References in periodicals archive ?
Although some studies suggest that the levels of n-3 fatty acids should be lower than n-6 fatty acids in diets of freshwater fish.
Polyunsaturated fatty acids intake including n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, has beneficial effects on both animal and consumer health.
Dietary n-3 fatty acid ratio, relative to n-6 fatty acid recommended not to be less than 0.1 for ideal nutritive value in human (FAO/WHO, 1994; Gerster, 1998), but it was lower for both the BAS and CLA groups in our study (0.06 and 0.09 in breast meat, 0.07 and 0.10 in thigh meat, respectively).
However, carp and tilapia are generally regarded as omnivorous fish and are considered to require greater amounts of n-6 fatty acids than n-3 fatty acids in their diets (Takeuchi et al., 2002).
The high PUFAs, total n-6 fatty acids and total n-3 fatty acids concentrations observed in broilers fed canola based diets could be a result of the contribution of protein source that was used in the diets in synergy with the activities of the feed additives in modulating the synthesis of intrinsic beneficial fatty acids that promotes the health of consumers.
Among the predominating fatty acids are important dietary n-3 fatty acids such as [alpha]-linolenic acid (ALA, C18:3n-3), stearidonic acid (SDA, C18:4n-3), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) as well as two n-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA, C18:2n-6), and arachidonic acid (AA, C20:4n-6).
Yu, "Opposing effects of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on mammary carcinogenesis: the Singapore Chinese health study," British Journal of Cancer, vol.
Modern diets have a high concentration of saturated fatty acids and also n-6 fatty acids instead of [omega]-3.
Relation between dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids and clinically diagnosed dry eye syndrome in women.
High doses of n-6 fatty acids in the diet can cause metabolic dysfunction, induce the onset of obesity, and potentially induce cardiometabolic diseases [4, 5].
Hydroxy-alkenals from the peroxidation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids and urinary metabolites.
(9) Laboratory investigations have indicated that n-3 fatty acids inhibit and n-6 fatty acids stimulate prostate tumor growth, but it still remains unclear if the dietary intake of these fatty acids affects the risk of prostate cancer in human beings (Leitzmann, et al., 2004).