n-hexadecane

n-hexadecane

[¦en¦hek·sə′de‚kān]
(organic chemistry)
C16H34 A colorless, solid hydrocarbon, melting point 20°C; a standard reference fuel in determining the ignition quality (cetane number) of diesel fuels. Also known as cetane.
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the study, Hong-Qi Wang and Yan-Jun Chen College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, working with Bo-Ya Qin of the Ministry of Environmental Protection of China, have investigated the activity of enzymes from the bacterium Bacillus cereus DQ01, which can digest the hydrocarbon n-hexadecane.
The team has now found that enzymes within the microbial cell and in its membrane inner membrane are responsible for degradation of n-hexadecane.
By contrast, n-hexadecane diffusion was hindered significantly in post-soaked samples.
Common building-grade southern yellow pine softwood (Kaiser 1999) was used with three model contaminants: n-hexadecane, naphthalene, and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT).
The aliquot sizes of the applied contaminants were: n-hexadecane, 5 [micro]L of a 100-g/L solution in n-octane; naphthalene, 5 [micro]L of a 100-g/L solution in n-octane; and DNT, 25 [micro]L of a 170-g/L solution in ethanol.
Only selected experiments with n-hexadecane as a contaminant were conducted with such specimens.
The catalytic partial oxidation of n-decane and n-hexadecane mixing with air over a Rh-coated monolith produces synthesis gas ([H.
In the first experiment, building-grade concrete samples were saturated with naphthalene or n-hexadecane, two representative hydrocarbons found in fuel oil.
After seven days of incubation, just 19% of the n-hexadecane and 35% of the naphthalene was removed.
In contrast, applying bacteria on filter paper or agar removed 80% of n-hexadecane and 55% of naphthalene.