nail shank

nail shank

The main body of a nail; the shaft between the head of the nail at one end and the point of the nail at the other end.
References in periodicals archive ?
The resistance of a nail to withdrawal from wood-based materials is characterized by several factors, including framing member material density and moisture content/conditioning, nail shank diameter, and the depth of penetration (US Department of Agriculture [USDA] 2010).
Plywood slivers (of the width of the nail shank) of the two inner plies protruded from the edge of the plywood in some of these joints.
Avoid this problem by predrilling a hole the size of the nail shank. Another trick is to blunt the tip of the nail with your hammer before pounding it in.
Immediately after driving the nail into the deckboard and joist, the wood fibers surrounding the nail in both the deckboard and the joist create friction force by pressing against the nail shank. As the lumber dries, the wood fibers shrink away from the nail shank, resulting in less friction force.
* Drill pilot holes for the nails with a bit about the size of the nail shank. This works great for toenailing in tight spots.
Ram the claw into the nail shank as close as possible to the wood and rock it sideways (Photo 1).
Once you find the joists, predrill a hole in the hardwood about two-thirds the size of the nail shank and drive a nail through each board until you stop the squeak.
Nail each panel so that it hangs from the nail shank, leaving a gap between the nailhead and the vinyl (Photo 4).
If the nailhead pulls off, use locking pliers to grab the nail shank.
To install your new trim, you'll need to drill pilot holes slightly smaller than the size of the nail shank. Use 6d finish nails to attach the side and head casing to the inside edges of the jamb, leaving a 3/16-in.
Choose a drill bit that's 4/5 the thickness of the nail shank. The slightly smaller bit offers the best holding power in hardwoods.