naked light

naked light

[′nā·kəd ′līt]
(mining engineering)
Open flame, such as a match or a burning cigarette, that is a fire risk in mines.
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References in classic literature ?
He examined the labels while I held folded hat and naked light.
An inquest held on July 30, 1919, the 2nd engineer Officer Henry Fraser admitted he took a naked light down into the forepeak despite notices on the ship warning against using naked lights on the vessel.
An inquiry into the disaster revealed the explosion had been caused by a naked light igniting a small amount of gas which had accumulated at the bottom of the pit shaft.
| Unless you have prior written consent from the operator, you can't bring fire or any other naked light on to the network.
When the simulation time is 750 s, the indoor fire spreads out of the room through the doors, windows, skylights, and other openings and ignites the roof waterproofing and insulation layers, and a naked light appears on the roof, which leads to a sharp increase in the temperature of heat flow on the roof.
Unfortunately, the blasting gave rise to naked light, and then the gas was lighted and began burning.
At the time mentioned there was a loud report, and a tremor which was felt for miles around." It was later found the explosion had been caused by firedamp - gases found in coal mines - ignited by a naked light near the face of the main west heading.
Thus, buying an ordinary naked light bulb simply won't do anymore.
Paul Simon wrote the brilliant Simon and Garfunkel song "The Sound of Silence" 50 years ago and it has another example of an oxymoron: "And in the naked light I saw, Ten thousand people, maybe more, People talking without speaking, People hearing without listening, People writing songs that voices never share, and no one dared, Disturb the sound of silence." We are living this in Turkey now.
PAUL Simon famously wrote in 'The Sound of Silence',' 'And in the naked light I saw 10,000 people, maybe more, people talking without speaking, people hearing without listening.' Oh, how true.