naltrexone


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naltrexone

[nal′trek‚zōn]
(pharmacology)
C20H23NO4 An opiate receptor antagonist that blocks the effects of endogenous opioids in the brain; used to treat alcoholism.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is therefore possible that the efficacy of naltrexone increases if administration is supervised by a relative or nurse, in which case the patient can also be intensively monitored and urine tests carried out periodically (Guardia Serecigni et al., 2008).
Exclusion criteria included comorbid other drug addictions (Except tobacco), significant comorbid psychiatric or medical ailment, age <18 years, refusal to sign consent, and known history of any adverse reaction with Naltrexone or Quetiapine.
Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist, acting primarily on the mu receptors.
Evidence shows naltrexone can prevent a return to drinking
Whereas patients risk missing a dose with MMT, patients that receive a on naltrexone implant are more likely not to miss their daily dose of naltrexone as long as the implant is providing therapeutic levels until it completely dissolves months later
The new meta-analysis combined findings from five other papers, comprising a total of 1,565 patients who received extended-release Naltrexone compared to other therapies for six months, among nearly 60,000 overall patients.
The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of anaesthesia-related adverse events in patients undergoing removal of naltrexone implants.
"If I were to start an opioid-dependent patient on a drug such as naltrexone as a blocking agent, I would want the person following that patient to be reliable, to be maintaining the same kind of quality we have here," Golden says.
Naltrexone is an opiate antagonist that primarily blocks u-receptors with more variable occupancy of 8-receptors at the standard dose of 50 mg daily (Weerts et al.
Naltrexone was first approved in the 1980s as a prescription drug to reverse the effects of opiate poisoning.
No prior studies have examined access to oral naltrexone, which is FDA-approved for OUD treatment.
Towers reported outcomes for a subset of pregnant women with OUD who received naltrexone as MAT.