Nancy

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Nancy

(näNsē`), city (1990 pop. 102,410), capital of Meurthe-et-Moselle dept., NE France, on the Meurthe River and the Marne-Rhine Canal. It is the administrative, economic, and educational center of LorraineLorraine
, Ger. Lothringen, former province and former administrative region, NE France, bordering in the N on Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany, in the E on Alsace, in the S on Franche-Comté, and in the W on Champagne.
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. Situated at the edge of the huge Lorraine iron fields, Nancy is an industrial city manufacturing chemicals, clothing, processed food, and machinery. It is one of eight cities specially targeted by the government for urban development. In the city are a noted fine arts museum, an academy of fine arts, and a large university (founded 1854). Nancy grew around a castle of the dukes of Lorraine and became the duchy capital in the 12th cent. In 1477, Charles the Bold of Burgundy was defeated and killed at the gates of Nancy by Swiss troops and the forces of René II of Lorraine. The major part of the center of Nancy, a model of urban planning and a gem of 18th-century architecture, was built during the liberal reign of Stanislaus I, duke of Lorraine (reigned 1738–66) and ex-king of Poland. Nancy passed to the French crown in 1766. In 1848 it was one of the first cities to proclaim the republic. From 1870 to 1873 it was occupied by the Germans following the Franco-Prussian War, and it was partially destroyed in World War I. Points of interest include the Place Stanislas, the Place de la Carrière, an 18th-century cathedral, and the 16th-century ducal palace. The Church of Cordeliers (15th cent.) houses the magnificent tombs of the princes of Lorraine.

Nancy

 

a city in northeastern France, on the Meurthe River and the Marne-Rhine Canal. It is the historical center of Lorraine and the administrative center of the department of Meurthe-et-Moselle. Population, 123,000 (1968; with suburbs, 258,000).

Nancy is the economic center of the industrial Lorraine region. Industries include electrotechnic and transportation machine building, shoe and clothing manufacture, and food processing. Art objects made of glass and faience are also produced. The city has a university, as well as institutes of mining, energetics, metallurgy, water resources and forestry, and commerce. Iron ore is mined in the suburbs of Nancy; they are also the site of metallurgical plants.

The city’s recorded history dates back to the tenth century. From the 13th to 18th centuries, Nancy was the residence of the dukes of Lorraine. On Jan. 5, 1477, during the Burgundian Wars of 1474–77, a battle between the duke of Burgundy, Charles the Bold (10,000 men, mostly knightly cavalry), and Duke Rene II of Lorraine (as many as 20,000 men, mostly Swiss mercenary infantry) took place near Nancy. Under cover of a snowstorm, the Swiss outflanked and routed the Burgundians, and Charles the Bold was killed. The outcome of the battle confirmed the superiority of infantry over knightly cavalry and led to the collapse of the duchy of Burgundy.

Nancy’s principal architectural landmarks are the cathedral (begun 1703, architect J. Hardouin Mansart; completed 1742, architect G. G. Boffrand), the Porte de la Crafle (c. 1365), the Church of the Cordeliers (15th century) with tombs of the dukes of Lorraine (14th to 16th centuries), the Ducal Palace (first half of the 16th century), and 18th-century residential houses near the Place d’Alliance. The Place Stanislas, the Place de la Carriere, and the Place Royale are noteworthy examples of French baroque city planning (1752–61, E. Héré). Modern buildings include the university (begun 1960’s, P. Nannée) and the multistory Joffre office building (1962, A. Prouvé).

REFERENCE

Martin, R., and M. Grosjean. Nancy. Paris, 1959.

Nancy

a city in NE France: became the capital of the dukes of Lorraine in the 12th century, becoming French in 1766; administrative and financial centre. Pop.: 103 605 (1999)
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