nannoplankton


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nannoplankton

[¦nan·ō′plaŋk·tən]
(biology)
Minute plankton; the smallest (usually from 2 to 20 nanometers) plankton, including algae, bacteria, and protozoans. Also spelled nanoplankton.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1996a): Calcareous nannoplankton mass extinction at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary: an update.
(1978): Cretaceous nannoplankton biostratigraphy and oceanography of the northwestern Atlantic ocean.
Nannoplankton fruto the Galapagos Islands: Michaelsarsia elegans Gran and Haloppapus adriaticus Schiller (coccolithophorids) with special reference to coccoliths and their unmineralized comoponents.
As well, the record shows that more than 90 percent of the calcareous nannoplankton species went extinct at that time, and that most life disappeared from the upper portions of the ocean for almost a half million years, an effect geochemists call the "Strangelove Ocean."
"At the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, 93 percent of the nannoplankton went extinct," said Timothy J.
"Nannoplankton are the base of the food chain in the ocean.
(1977): Changes in calcareous nannoplankton in the Cretaceous-Tertiary biotic crisis at Zumaya, Spain.
Nannoplankton with calcium-based shells were the primary photosynthetic producers in the oceans until 65 million years ago, at the boundary between the Cretaceous and Palaeogene periods.
(1982): Biostratigraphy and isotope stratigraphy and the 'catastrophic' extinction of calcareous nannoplankton at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary.
Nannoplankton and protozoan microzooplankton during the J60FS North Atlantic bloom experiment: 1919 and 1990.
Due to their microscopic size and the near-global distribution of many taxa, calcareous nannoplankton have become very popular for solving various stratigraphic problems, and many studies have been devoted to that end.