nanorobot

nanorobot

A nanoscale robot. "Autonomous" nanorobots have their own nanoscale computers built in, while "insect" nanorobots are deployed in groups and are controlled by a central computer.


Fixing One Cell at a Time
By 2020, scientists at Rutgers University believe that nanorobots will be injected into the bloodstream and administer a drug directly to an infected cell. This nanorobot has a carbon nanotube body, a biomolecular motor that propels it and peptide limbs to orient itself. Because it is composed of biological elements such as DNA and proteins, it will be easily removed from the body. For more information, see http://bionano.rutgers.edu/Mavroidis_Final_Report.pdf. (Image courtesy of the Bio-Nano Robotics team at Rutgers University: Constantinos Mavroidis, Martin L. Yarmush, Atul Dubey, Angela Thornton, Kevin Nikitczuk, Silvina Tomassone, Fotios Papadimitrakopoulos and Bernie Yurke.)
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References in periodicals archive ?
CEO talking to Director: "We're replacing the Employee Health Plan with nanorobot technology.
The participants were not aware of the Nanorobot development or advancements in Nano implants/Nano composites.
One case study is exhibited by Ranjbar and Hafezi-Moghadam [95] who have designed a MPT64 antibody aptamer-based DNA nanorobot. The lock is constituted by the duplex formation between the aptamer sequence and the complementary strand.
* "Cancer-fighting Nanorobot May Be Able to Target Tumors, Spare Healthy Tissue," by Michelle Castilo.
Harvard University scientists are tinkering with DNA-based robots as well, having created an "origami nanorobot" that can transport molecular payloads.
Advantages for these motile organisms are in vivo steerability and external control by MRI systems favors this type of "nanorobot".
This vision of a bionic nanorobot called NANO-Copter is made of a carbon nano-tube, which forms the main body with flexible limbs that are used to move and manipulate objects, and a biomolecular motor located on the head with a propeller of Ni.
Other endeavors to incorporate the benefits of nanotechnology into the medical world include the theory of the development of the microbivore or medical nanorobot: "a machine the size of a bacterium, comprising many thousands of molecule-sized mechanical parts (resembling gears, bearings, and ratchets), possibly composed of a strong diamondlike material" (Freitas, 2009, p.
This paper deals with the concepts of true microrobot and nanorobot use for military applications.
It's a DNA nanorobot, a primitive version of the machines that may someday perform tasks too small for humans to do.