nanosecond


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nanosecond

[′nan·ə‚sek·ənd]
(mechanics)
A unit of time equal to one-billionth of a second, or 10-9 second.

nanosecond

(unit)
(ns) 10^-9 seconds; one thousand millionth part of a second.

This is the unit in which the fundamental logical operations of modern digital circuits are typically measured. For example, a microprocessor with a clock frequency of 100 megahertz will have a 10 nanosecond clock period.

nanosecond

(1) One billionth of a second. Used to measure the speed of logic and memory chips, a nanosecond can be visualized by converting it to distance. In one nanosecond, electricity travels approximately a foot in a wire. Admiral Grace Hopper was famous for handing out strands of "telephone wire nanoseconds" to her audience whenever she lectured about technology. Holding the wire turns the unreal concept of a billionth of a second into reality.

Even at 186,000 miles per second, electricity is never fast enough for the hardware designer who worries over a few inches of circuit path. The slightest delay is multiplied millions of times, since billions of pulses are sent through a wire in a single second. In addition, today's chips contain more than a thousand feet of wire traces, which are the circuit pathways that carry electricity. See space/time, jiffy and ohnosecond.

(2) The time between a traffic light turning green and a New York City cab driver blowing his horn.
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To do so, the team put the wafer in a chamber of boron chloride gas and blasted each spot with a powerful ultraviolet laser that emitted 200 bursts, each lasting 25 nanoseconds.
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With exposure times that can be measured in hou rs rather than nanoseconds, FeltenMassinger's near-panoramic landscapes (without a lens, a camera's angle of vision is about I20 degrees) have an uncanny depth of field, and their tones are dense and somber; no shadows are cast, nor is there a consistent source of light.