nanostructured material

nanostructured material

[′nan·ōstrək·chərd mətir·ē·əl]
(materials)
A material whose composition is modulated over nanometer length scales in zero, one, two, or three dimensions. Also known as nanocomposite material.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Puskas, Ph.D., M.E, and her colleagues are currently developing an alternative nanostructured material to silicone rubber that will minimize complications.
Low internal resistance of the nanostructured material raises the power density.
The nanostructured material prevents ice from forming in temperatures as low as -13 to -22 degrees Fahrenheit.
To rehabilitate the steep slopes of a fire-ravaged forest above sacred grounds of the Taos Indians, specialists turned to a new nanostructured material.
The presentation of nanostructured material in solar energy conversion was extensively studied by Oelhafen and Schuler [27], where it describes on the dye sensitized solar cell in nanoscale form and the application of nanostructured a-C: H/Au in the solar cell.
A pilot plant, expected to be completed during this program, is intended to enable accelerated application of advanced nanostructured material systems.
In order to perform the in vitro cell response assays, all Zn[Al.sub.2][O.sub.4] bulk and 550[degrees]C nanostructured material surfaces were cleaned with distilled water and sterilized by exposure to UV light ([lambda] = 254 nm, 300 uW/[cm.sup.2]).
In general, a nanostructured material is composed of particles or grains 1 to 100 nm across or of layers or filaments with thicknesses in that range, said Richard W.
In addition, they observe an increase of 200% in the yielding point of the bolts manufactured with nanostructured material. Another interesting study is that by Yanagida et al.
Here, we showed that if a waveguide is tapered properly it acts like a sophisticated nanostructured material," the researcher said
TEHRAN (FNA)- A new nanostructured material with applications that could include reducing condensation in airplane cabins and enabling certain medical tests without the need for high tech laboratories has been developed by researchers at the University of Sydney.