nap

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nap

1
a. the raised fibres of velvet or similar cloth
b. the direction in which these fibres lie when smoothed down

nap

2
1. a card game similar to whist, usually played for stakes
2. a call in this card game, undertaking to win all five tricks
3. Horse racing a tipster's choice for an almost certain winner
4. go nap
a. to undertake to win all five tricks at nap
b. to risk everything on one chance
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

nap

[nap]
(textiles)
Fuzzy fibers on the surface of a fabric; produced by a finishing process called raising.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

nap

The relatively short fuzzy ends of fibers forming the surface of the carpet.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

NAP

(1) (Network Access Protection) See endpoint security.

(2) (Network Access Point) The first public Internet exchange points (IXPs). Established by the National Science Foundation in the early 1990s, they were set up to provide a standard way to exchange packets for commercial backbones. When the Net went commercial in 1995, four official NAPs were created. Three were run by the telephone companies in San Francisco, Chicago and Pennsauken, NJ, and the fourth was run by Metropolitan Fiber Systems (MFS) in Washington, D.C., known as MAE-East (Metropolitan Area Exchange-East). Four more MAEs became de facto NAPs along with two federal exchanges and the Commercial Internet Exchange Association (see CIX).

From a Dozen to Hundreds
Since the first NAPs, hundreds of public exchange points were created around the world, which serve to interconnect all the backbone networks and provide on-ramps to smaller ISPs. See IXP.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nineteen of 20 nurses in the study napped on their night shifts, with a mean nap length of 1.5 hours.
Sleep researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst found that kids who napped performed significantly better on a visual-spatial task in the afternoon after a nap and the next day than those who did not nap.
10 by the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society suggests that women age 69 and older who reported more time each week napping were more likely to die over a seven-year period than women who napped less.
Those who napped at least once a week had a 26 per cent greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes compared with those who never took a nap.