narrow-beam antenna

narrow-beam antenna

[′nar·ō ¦bēm an′ten·ə]
(electromagnetism)
An antenna which radiates most of its power in a cone having a radius of only a few degrees.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A narrow-beam antenna is needed at both sensors to exclude some of the competing jammer signals so that the correlator can resolve the remainder without requiring an excessively long dwell time.
In some cases, the receiver has a narrow-beam antenna that adds isolation, but this doesn't work in systems requiring continuous omnidirectional coverage.
Conceptually, the simplest direction-finding (DF) technique is the use of a single narrow-beam antenna. If only one emitter falls into the antenna beam, and we know the azimuth and elevation pointing angles of the antenna, we know the azimuth and elevation to the emitter.
The first approach results in a power dilution equal to the beamwidth of the potential narrow-beam antenna used in the second approach, divided by the beamwidth of the broadband antenna required in the first approach.
The first approach results in power dilution equal to the beamwidth of the potential narrow-beam antenna used in the second approach, divided by the beamwidth of the broadband antenna required in the first approach.
The arena solution impressed VVIP guests and international visitors in attendance with its specialised narrow-beam antennas delivering a higher capacity, enabling fans to stay connected and share their experiences with the world.
This occurs at high frequencies and high altitudes but-also occurs when narrow-beam antennas reduce the impact of reflection paths on the propagation.
A similar LPI measure is the use of narrow-beam antennas or antennas with suppressed side lobes.
They can be pulsed (whereas communications signals use continuous modulations) and they have narrow-beam antennas that can be scanned past the receiver location whereas communications signals usually use omnidirectional antennas or fixed wide-beam antennas.
A strong signal will allow the use of wide-beamwidth antennas (which have less gain than narrow-beam antennas) and wide-bandwidth receivers (which have less sensitivity than narrow-bandwidth receivers).
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