narrow-sense heritability


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narrow-sense heritability

[¦nar·ō ‚sens ‚her·ə·tə′bil·əd·ē]
(genetics)
The degree to which individual phenotypes are determined by the genes transmitted from the parents; expressed as the ratio of the additive genetic variance to the total phenotypic variance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Estimates of individual narrow-sense heritability ([h.sup.2.sub.a]) are considered low, according to a criterion established by RESENDE (2002), which is common for quantitative characters in perennial plants.
Narrow-sense heritability is the proportion of the total phenotypic variation that is due to the additive effects of genes.
Thus, SNP-based heritability estimates obtained from very distantly related individuals will tend to be lower than the true narrow-sense heritability.
Using Warner (1952)'s method, narrow-sense heritability (h2) for all characters and expected direct genetic gains (Allard, 1964) besides indirect genetic responses (Falconer and Mackay, 1996) were determined, and the genetic correlations (rG) between plant height and other traits were calculated using covariance method which was according to Yildirim and Ikiz (1973).
The values of narrow-sense heritability vary from 35% for awn length to 72% for spike weight and seed yield.
Narrow-sense heritability is defined as the proportion of resistance that is controlled by additive gene effects (Poehlman and Sleper, 1995).
When distinguishing among different types of genetic influence, it is possible to calculate broad-sense heritability ([h.sup.2.sub.B]), which encompasses all genetic influences ([a.sup.2] + [d.sup.2] + [i.sup.2]), or narrow-sense heritability ([h.sup.2.sub.N]), which reflects only additive effects ([a.sup.2]).
Each regression coefficient and its standard error could be related to narrow-sense heritability (the ratio of additive genetic variance to phenotypic variance) after doubling because measurements were only made on one parent.
This was further supported by the low estimates of narrow-sense heritability for this trait in both environments.
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