Capsule

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capsule

1. a soluble case of gelatine enclosing a dose of medicine
2. a thin metal cap, seal, or cover, such as the foil covering the cork of a wine bottle
3. Botany
a. a dry fruit that liberates its seeds by splitting, as in the violet, or through pores, as in the poppy
b. the spore-producing organ of mosses and liverworts
4. Anatomy
a. a cartilaginous, fibrous, or membranous envelope surrounding any of certain organs or parts
b. a broad band of white fibres (internal capsule) near the thalamus in each cerebral hemisphere
5. an aeroplane cockpit that can be ejected in a flight emergency, complete with crew, instruments, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Capsule

 

in biology:

  1. In animals and man, the membrane surrounding various organs and their parts (for example, the kidney, liver, or joint capsules) and also pathological formations (parasites that have implanted themselves in tissue, necrotic masses, foreign bodies). A capsule is composed primarily of fibrous connective tissue and sometimes of adipose cellular tissue.
  2. The gelatinous layer around a cell characteristic of the capsulated bacteria, formed from macromolecular substances produced by these microorganisms[11–1083^]

Capsule

 

(1) A dry dehiscent fruit with many seeds (sometimes with one seed), formed of two or several carpels. Capsules dehisce by means of a lid (plantain, henbane), tiny holes (poppy, bellflower), denticles on top of the capsule (primrose, pinks), or longitudinal splits (valves) along the septum (tobacco, hellebore) or along the valves (tulip, lily, hyacinth).

(2) The spore-bearing part of the sporangium of mosses. These capsules are either cylindrical or spherical.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

capsule

[′kap·səl]
(aerospace engineering)
A small, sealed, pressurized cabin with an internal environment that will support human or animal life during extremely high-altitude flight, space flight, or escape.
(engineering)
A boxlike component or unit, often sealed.
(anatomy)
A membranous structure enclosing a body part or organ.
(botany)
A closed structure bearing seeds or spores; it is dehiscent at maturity.
(microbiology)
A thick, mucous envelope, composed of polypeptide or carbohydrate, surrounding certain microorganisms.
(pharmacology)
A soluble shell in which drugs are enclosed for oral administration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the neurocranium, nasal capsules expand ventrolaterally; in Urotrygon nana and Urotrygon munda the capsules migration towards the ventral region is barely evident (Fig.
In the ethmoidal region, the nasal capsule of the Mabuya is broad, very developed, and similar to others lizards such as the scincids Chalcides ocellatus, Eutropis carinata (= Mabuya carinata), Plestiodon fasciauts (= Eumeces quinquelineatus), Trachylepis capensis (= Mabuya capensis), Lygosoma, the lacertids Lacerta vivipara, and Acanthodactylus boskiana, the anguid Anguis fragilis, and the gimnophthalmid Ptychoglossus bicolor (Rice 1920; Pearson 1921; Rao & Ramaswami 1952; El Toubi & Kamal 1961; Skinner 1973; Bellaris & Kamal 1981; Hernandez et al.
* In the eighth week of gestation, intramembranous ossification begins on the membrane that covers the cartilaginous nasal capsule. During this phase, there are two ossification centers in the posteroinferior part of the nasal septum; they are located between the nasal septal cartilage medially and the nasopalatine nerves laterally.