Rhinoscopy

(redirected from nasal endoscopy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rhinoscopy

 

an instrumental diagnostic procedure used to examine the nasal cavity and to study the turbinate bones, nasal septum and vomer, and nasopharynx. The term “rhinoscopy” was introduced in 1860 by the Czech physiologist J. Czermak. Two-valved nasal specula, nasal dilators, and special mirrors are used in rhinoscopy.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The left nasal passages were again examined by nasal endoscopy and no abnormality was detected.
Recurrence of disease was defined as evidence of nasal polyposis on nasal endoscopy or recurrence of sinonasal symptoms.
CT Scan and nasal endoscopy was carried out in each case, Nasal polyposis was staged in 03 categories i.e.
A diagnosis of rhinolithiasis may be solely clinical, occurring after direct visualization by anterior rhinoscopy or nasal endoscopy. A CT scan may also aid in determining potential sequelae, such as septal deviation, bony erosion, and sinusitis.
All patients had nasal endoscopy and sinus CT scans that were negative.
Once the patient had been sitting for 10 minutes after the nose had been prepared, they were asked to lie down on the examining couch with the head slightly turned towards the examiner for the nasal endoscopy to proceed.
Nasal endoscopy revealed a polypoid mass on the left lateral nasal wall arising near the uncinate process and protruding into the middle meatus.
Nasal endoscopy, rhinomanometry, nasal cytology and odor threshold measurements were performed in subjects randomized to daily nasal irrigations with either thermal water or isotonic sodium chloride solution for 1 month.
Another valuable diagnostic tool is the nasal endoscopy in the differential diagnosis of rhinolithiasis.
Nasal endoscopy was normal, except for irregular nasopharyngeal mucosa.
Generally these bleeders are not visible without the use of nasal endoscopy, especially if they occur on the lateral wall of the nasal cavity, a complex anatomical area characterised by the turbinate bones and meati, which have recesses between them.
If a physician looks in the nose and can't see any of those signs, then "we recommend an x-ray to confirm the diagnosis" if nasal endoscopy is not offered in the practice setting, he continued.