native


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native

(of chemical elements, esp metals) found naturally in the elemental form

Native

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A native is a person born in a particular place. In astrology, this term refers to the person for whom a natal chart was cast. In the latter sense, it is a useful, concise term that, in any extended discussion, is preferable to “person for whom this chart was cast” or some such other unwieldy expression. The term native can also refer to someone born under a particular sign, as when one says that she or he is a native of Cancer.

native

[′nād·iv]
(biology)
Grown, produced or originating in a specific region or country.
(geochemistry)
Pertaining to an element found in nature in a nongaseous state.

native application

An executable program coded in the machine language of the hardware platform it is running in. Native applications are compiled into the machine language of that CPU. For example, Windows and Mac executable apps are in x86 machine language, while mobile apps are ARM based (see x86 and ARM).

Native Apps vs. Web Apps
Native apps are often contrasted with Web-based applications that are stored on a server and interpreted one line at a time by the browser's JavaScript and HTML interpreters. A native app will always run faster than a Web app, because there is no translation processing taking place. See Web application.

Native Apps vs. Emulated Apps
Like a Web app, an emulated app is also translated into the machine language of the computer at runtime and is considerably slower than a program developed for that platform to start with. See emulator.

Native vs. True Native
With the advent of mobile apps, the terminology began to change. Whereas in the past, a native app was a precompiled program in machine language, a native app today can be an interpreted app or one that is compiled at runtime. See native mobile app.
References in classic literature ?
The two natives interchanged glances of peculiar meaning with one another at this, and manifested no little surprise; but on the repetition of the question after some consultation together, to the great joy of Toby, they answered in the affirmative.
A few moments after the whole valley resounded with savage outcries, and the natives came running towards us from every direction.
Such provisions as they could furnish, however, were brought by the natives in abundance, and a lively intercourse was kept up during the day, in which the women mingled in the kindest manner.
The natives, generally, disclaimed the outrage, and brought the shattered remains of the boat and the dead body of the seaman to the ship.
"This way, bwana," replied the native. "Carefully have I kept silence in the village that he might be still asleep when you returned.
A moment later a horde of terrified natives burst from the jungle, racing toward the shelter of their huts.
In spite of Ned Newton's cry, Tom's finger pressed the switch-trigger of the electric rifle, for previous experience had taught him that it was sometimes the best thing to awe the natives in out-of-the-way corners of the earth.
But the first native who placed his hand on the stair-rail, struck from behind by some invisible force, I know not what, fled, uttering the most fearful cries and making the wildest contortions.
Presently, after loud yawning, the natives went away to sleep, and Strickland and I were left alone.
There was always the possibility that the natives had lied to him, and the more he questioned the Dyak woman the more firmly convinced he became that this was the fact.
During the former voyage of the Adventure and Beagle in 1826 to 1830, Captain Fitz Roy seized on a party of natives, as hostages for the loss of a boat, which had been stolen, to the great jeopardy of a party employed on the survey; and some of these natives, as well as a child whom he bought for a pearl-button, he took with him to England, determining to educate them and instruct them in religion at his own expense.
The peninsula of California was settled in 1698, by the Jesuits, who, certainly, as far as the natives were concerned, have generally proved the most beneficent of colonists.

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