natural period

natural period

[′nach·rəl ′pir·ē·əd]
(physics)
Period of the free oscillation of a body or system; when the period varies with amplitude, the natural period is the period when the amplitude approaches zero.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Healthy, typical sleep is a natural period of daily fasting.
This has been done to increase the natural heave period of the structure so the ratio of the structure natural period to water column natural period is within the guidelines established by Stappenbelt and Cooper (2009).
Resonance can happen in any system that swings or oscillates if you force it at its natural period. For example, if you give a child on a swing a small push at the right time, they will swing higher and higher, because you are forcing them at the natural period of the swing.
Commonwealth gold medallist Babita Phogat posted a picture of the team on her official Twitter account, captioning it, "Women wrestling team accept the challenge, Soch badal rahi h .....nothing to be ashamed of, It's natural period."
'Sleep is a natural period within every 24 hours when the body repairs itself, tests its systems, consolidates memory, purges itself of cellular waste and stockpiles energy for the day ahead,' Charles B.
Though the natural period did not show any improvement for design considerations, the safety of the structure as observed from drift at each storey level is good.
The fundamental natural period was calculated on the basis of mass and stiffness of the building.
[4] described and identified, for an undamped base excited single-degree-of-freedom system, three regions of response: the isolation region where the maximum response is much smaller than the amplitude of the base input (when the pulse length is much smaller than the natural period of the system), the amplification region where the maximum response is larger than the amplitude of the base input (when the pulse length is approximately equal to the natural period of the system), and the quasistatic region where the response follows the base input (when the pulse length is much larger than the natural period of the system).
Such a period is a natural period which is different from the spectrum period.