naval stores


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naval stores,

term initially applied to the cordage, mask, resin, tar, and timber used in building wooden sailing ships; it now designates the products obtained from the pine tree, e.g., pine oil, pitch, rosin, tar, and turpentine. These products fall into two classes, those obtained from living pines and those from dead pines. Most of the naval stores used in the world are produced in the SE United States and in S Europe. Naval stores are now used largely in the manufacture of soap, paint, varnish, shoe polish, lubricants, linoleum, and roofing material.
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naval stores

[′nā·vəl ‚stȯrz]
(materials)
Pitch and rosin formerly used in the construction of wooden ships.
All pine wood products, including rosin, turpentine, and pine oils.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

naval stores

1. Oils, resins, tars, and pitches obtained from the oleoresin of pine trees.
2. Obsolete name for resin and turpentine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
EARLY TRAVELERS IN THE SOUTH NEVER FAILED TO REMARK UPON THE curious and odoriferous activities of the naval stores workers they came across in the vast longleaf pine forests that stretched from Virginia to Texas.
Long before readers finish Robert Outland's engrossing Tapping the Pines: The Naval Stores Industry in the American South, however, they will be convinced that there was nothing colorful about the industry as it was developed over three centuries in the South.

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