Never

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Never

 

(also Bol’shoi Never), an urban-type settlement in Skovorodino Raion, Amur Oblast, RSFSR. It is located on the Bol’shoi Never River (a tributary of the Amur). Bol’shoi Never railroad station on the Trans-Siberian Railroad, 15 km east of Skovorodino. The Amur-Yakutsk Highway begins in Never. The settlement is a transshipping point for cargos to the Yakut ASSR. It has automotive repair shops and other automotive transport enterprises.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
I am chaste, I am young, I am lusty and strong, And my habit off change in a day: To Court I ne'er go, am no Lady or Beau; Yet as frail and fantastic as they.
Their desertion - and the subsequent attacks by the ne'er do wells - spell out the wrong message about this vibrant area.
It is not a question of what type of recruit they take - the point is the army appears to be the only people who can change these ne'er do wells.
El Beardo called up to let us know the Channel Street skatepark in his beloved San Pedro now boasts a new pork chop bowl thanks to the usual crew of concrete coercing ne'er do wells.
FAB OR FOUL?: A popular event in the revamped Lower Precinct (above left) and (right) Watford, described as Coventry's "grim, ne'er do well southern brother"
It's the one where Paul Daniels, Debbie McGee, Peter Stringfellow and a load of other ne'er do wells get mauled by lions.
The second Triad which is flowering yet In this eternal never-fading spring, Ne'er by the Ram in his night-raids beset,
What exactly does the saying "Ne'er cast a clout 'til May is out" actually mean?
I WAS always told the old saying "Ne'er cast a cloot till May is oot" was in reference to the may flower, not the month of May.
In the August 1981 Kickshaws, Faith Eckler presented a 19th-century riddle from Great Britain: In the morn when I rise, I open my eyes, Tho' I ne'er sleep a wink all night; If I wake e'er so soon, I still lie till noon, And pay no regard to the light.
B was a Blockhead, and ne'er learned his book." The book was imitated in The New York Primer, The American Primer, and similar texts; only the title page was different.