toxic epidermal necrolysis

(redirected from necrolysis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

toxic epidermal necrolysis

[¦tak·sik ‚ep·ə‚dər·məl nə′kräl·ə·səs]
(medicine)
Intraepidermal blistering and separation of the outer epidermis, giving the appearance and the management problems of a scald, caused by infection with Staphylococcus aureus strains producing one of the epidermolytic toxins, usually of phage group II. Also known as scalded skin syndrome.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The current understanding of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis.
812 It has also been mentioned that SJS can turn into more severe Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN).
Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Steven Johnson Syndrome (SJS) are considered to be two ends of a spectrum of severe, life threatening epidermolytic cutaneous adverse drug reactions, differing only by their extent of skin detachment.
Another worker reported fixed drug eruptions in 28 Percent , followed by Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis in 18.
Teraki Y, Murota H, Izaki S: Toxic epidermal necrolysis due to zonisamide associated with reactivation of human herpesvirus 6.
Outbreak of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with mebendazole and metronidazole use among Filipino laborers in Taiwan.
An update on Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in children.
1,6,10,12) These drugs are administered with the belief that they halt the process of epidermal necrolysis.
Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a rare, potentially deadly skin condition.
The family of Christopher Lofton, who contracted the rare skin disease toxic epidermal necrolysis and died after taking Motrin, sued Motrin's maker, alleging common law negligence and product liability.
1] Unexpected side effects of TNF antagonists increasingly reported in the literature are cutaneous adverse reactions which include skin rash, urticaria, hyperhidrosis, seborrheic dermatitis, alopecia, rosacea injection site reactions, non-melanoma skin cancer, lupus-like syndrome, erythema multiforme, Steven's Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis or psoriatic skin lesions.