needle

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needle,

implement of metal or other material used to carry the thread in sewing and in various forms of needlework and manufacturing. The earliest needles were merely awls or punches. Stone, bone, ivory, and thorns, with or without an eye, were used by primitive peoples. The midrib of the palm is used in Africa, with the thread tied on. Much of the embroidery of antiquity must have required fine needles; China is supposed to have first used steel ones, and the Moors are credited with carrying them to the West. The needle-making trade was established in Nuremberg in the 14th cent. and in England in Elizabeth's reign. In 1656 the first needlemakers' guild was chartered. Manufacturing by machinery developed gradually. In 1785 the first steel rod was mechanically prepared; in 1826 eyes were drilled by stamping, and by 1870 the manufacture was mostly mechanical. Different kinds of steel are used for different needles, e.g., chromium and stainless steel for surgical and hypodermic uses. Over 250 kinds of needles are made, such as the pearl needles of India, bead needles for fine beadwork, and others for carpets, shoes, upholstery, sailmaking, knitting, and every type of sewing machine.

What does it mean when you dream about a needle?

If something were “needling” a person, then this dream symbol would be appropriate. A threaded needle can indicate the repairing of, or the sewing up of, unfinished issues in one’s personal or business life. If, however, a needle is seen as an instrument of health in the hands of a doctor or a nurse, then health issues may be of concern to the dreamer. (See also Syringe, Vaccination).

needle

[′nēd·əl]
(botany)
A slender-pointed leaf, as of the firs and other evergreens.
(computer science)
A slender rod or probe used to sort decks of edge-punched cards by inserting it through holes along the margin of the deck and vibrating the deck so that cards having that particular hole are retained, but those having a notch cut at that hole position drop out.
(design engineering)
A device made of steel pointed at one end with a hole at the other; used for sewing.
A device made of steel with a hook at one end; used for knitting.
(engineering)
A piece of copper or brass about ½ inch (13 millimeters) in diameter and 3 or 4 feet (90 or 120 centimeters) long, pointed at one end, thrust into a charge of blasting powder in a borehole and then withdrawn, leaving a hole for the priming, fuse, or squib. Also known as pricker.
A thin pointed indicator on an instrument dial.
(engineering acoustics)
(geology)
A pointed, elevated, and detached mass of rock formed by erosion, such as an aiguille.
(hydrology)
A long, slender snow crystal that is at least five times as long as it is broad.
(mineralogy)
A needle-shaped or acicular mineral crystal.

needle

1. A piece of timber laid horizontally and supported on props or shores under a wall or building, etc.; provides temporary support while the foundation or part beneath is altered, repaired, or underpinned.
2. A short timber, or the like, which passes through a hole in a wall; used to support a shore, a scaffold, etc.

needle

1. 
a. another name for stylus
b. a small thin pointed device, esp one made of stainless steel, used to transmit the vibrations from a gramophone record to the pick-up
2. Med
a. the long hollow pointed part of a hypodermic syringe, which is inserted into the body
b. an informal name for hypodermic syringe
3. Surgery a pointed steel instrument, often curved, for suturing, puncturing, or ligating
4. a long narrow stiff leaf, esp of a conifer, in which water loss is greatly reduced
5. any slender sharp spine, such as the spine of a sea urchin
6. any slender pointer for indicating the reading on the scale of a measuring instrument
7. short for magnetic needle
8. a crystal resembling a needle in shape
9. a sharp pointed metal instrument used in engraving and etching
References in periodicals archive ?
It eliminates the chances of needle stick injuries and blood borne infections among the healthcare providers during the needle withdrawal and disposal.
Unfortunately this region has the highest rate of needle stick injuries as compared to the entire world.
Needle stick injuries can occur during a variety of procedures including needle recapping, injuries sustained in the operating room, during blood collection or intravenous line administration, suturing, checking blood sugar, careless disposal in garbage bags due to inadequate segregation at source, etc.
Needle stick injuries on the job can be costly to the employer and the employee.
Nurses who have extended working hours are at risk for medical errors, needle stick injuries, and accidents driving home.
The suit alleged that such non-safety devices are defectively designed, resulting in unnecessary secondary needle stick injuries to thousands of Ohio health care workers, and created an unreasonable risk of harm that easily could have been prevented by the use of alternative, safer designs incorporating post-use protection for exposed needles.
Needle stick injuries pose a risk not only to family members but also waste collectors and landfill workers.
The agreement grants to UNIVEC the exclusive worldwide rights to manufacture, use, market, and sell UME's patented protective shield designed to protect health care workers and others from needle stick injuries associated with hypodermic syringes.
This mode of vaccine delivery is highly precise and reliable, eliminating needle stick injuries to healthcare workers, as well as reducing the need for disposal of needle sharps and the possibility of needle re-use.
The advantages that will drive the growth of pre-filled syringes include ease of administration, improved safety, reduced risk of contamination, elimination of medication errors, low incidence of needle stick injuries, accurate dosing and reduction in medical expenditure due to reduced visits to healthcare facilities.
The nanopatch is also expected to cut needle stick injuries and cross contamination.
Needle stick injuries (NSI) are wounds caused by sharps such as hypodermic needles, blood collection needles, iv cannulas or needles used to connect parts of iv delivery systems.