negative charge


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negative charge

[′neg·əd·iv ′chärj]
(electricity)
The type of charge which is possessed by electrons in ordinary matter, and which may be produced in a resin object by rubbing with wool. Also known as negative electricity.
References in periodicals archive ?
For both soils, the negative charge increased with increasing pH and the positive charge increased with decreasing pH (Table 2).
High negative charge originating from the octahedral sheet was related to an increase in micropore surface area.
Before colliding, the grains have an overall neutral charge but are polarized by a background electric field, with a negative charge toward the top of the grain and a positive charge toward the bottom, relative to the ground.
The fluorescent color that appears under the UV light is affected by the negative charge on the sulfate group for cellulose sulfate or, for methyl cellulose, by the lone pair of electrons on the methoxyl group.
Like poles on a magnet, the negative charge at the bottom of the thundercloud and the positive charge of the ground are attracted to each other.
The asymmetry lies in this: Electricity exists as positive and negative charges, and these can be easily isolated-there are particles with positive charge only (positrons or protons) and particles with negative charge only (electrons or antiprotons).
The lighter particles in the whirlwind tend to develop a negative charge, and the heavier ones, a positive charge.
Titration tests showed that at their level of saturation, the solid surfaces in the pulp slurry were able to adsorb 2-4 times as much poly-DADMAC, compared to the amount just sufficient to neutralize the negative charge at the surfaces of the fiber fines and fibers present in the pulp slurry.
They now have a negative charge. The carpet, correspondingly, is left with a positive charge due to its deficit of electrons.
If, however, a proton and antiproton did not actually collide but passed each other closely, they might not undergo annihilation, but the positive charge of the proton and the negative charge of the antiproton might neutralize each other across the small gap, leaving two uncharged particles.
Ferricyanide is indeed an ion, with a negative charge of -3.
As wet end systems have closed up and furnishes have become more contaminated with anionic charge, a need has developed to neutralize the negative charge while maintaining the effectiveness of a chemical being used.