negative pole


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Related to negative pole: positive pole

negative pole

[′neg·əd·iv ′pōl]
(electromagnetism)
References in periodicals archive ?
Symmetrically, antiutopia can be defined as a reverse dual system, in which the negative pole belongs to a nightmarish elsewhere or elsewhen, the "here" and the "now" appearing, by contrast, as a positive, albeit imperfect pole, which is, in any case, preferable to the other pole.
They left more progeny than those at the negative pole, since people prefer as mates, fellow workers and leaders those who are agreeable and emotionally stable (Figueredo & Rusthon, 2009).
4 : being the part toward which the electric current flows from the outside circuit <the negative pole of a storage battery>
Then since g([+ or -][infinity]) = n - m, if n > m there must be one more positive ghost pole which is greater than the largest positive pole and one more negative ghost pole which is larger (in absolute value) than the largest negative pole (or either one of these cases if all poles are either all positive or all negative).
In the chamber bottom water-cooled bottom plate was placed, which was connected to negative pole of the power source.
negative pole of applied field), and (2) such a field may alter neuron-supporting glial-cell density and organization within the injury scar in a fashion that is less inhibitory to regeneration.
Individuals diagnosed by psychological autopsy as suffering from major depressive disorder, were being treated by a GP, had previously attempted suicide, had expressed their desire for death, had suffered adverse vital events during the six months prior to their death or had consulted a non- psychiatric doctor during the month before committing suicide were found to be towards the negative pole.
The strange that haunts the familiar appears in these stories as danger lurking just beyond the characters' comprehension, as the negative pole of the apparent normalcy with which each tale begins, and which each protagonist ultimately desires.
Karlsson does draw the interesting conclusion that Marguerite's antitheses usually offer a c learly positive and negative pole, so that her work is in that sense less balanced or open-ended than some scholars have suggested.
At the negative pole, what are e teaching children about copyright law?
Davidson (From Subject to Citizen: Australian Citizenship in the 20th Century, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1997) has previously written of the persistence and political-cultural ramifications of the centrality of this subjection to (and subjectification by) the Imperial Crown, even as an almost inevitable negative pole for oppositional and progressive redefinitions.