negotiated order


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negotiated order

an influential idea in studies of organizations which sees social order as the emergent product of processes of negotiation (e.g. conferring, bargaining, making arrangements, compromising, reaching agreements) between persons and groups. Social order is not fixed and immutable but is open to revision and reorganization through these processes. see also ORGANIZATION THEORY.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, the discussion is framed in terms of the impact of "negotiated order" in police work, an ecological theory of policing developed by David Klinger in 1997 that attempts to explain how police allocate their time relative to the demands on officers and resources available, as well as the influence of community structural factors on officer decision making.
When you see circus performers doing their bit without the big exotic cats, as is the case with "Negotiated Order #13" (2012), the whole thing looks absurd.
In the state case, the doctors entered into a negotiated order with the Oregon Medical Board in which each received a reprimand, agreed to pay a $10,000 fine and serve 100 hours of community service.
S-I makes use of the notion of "negotiated order," whereby when a person's predisposition to "act in a certain way" threatens group harmony, order is maintained through explicit or implicit negotiation.
A time deposit represents a negotiated order of withdrawal.
of New Mexico), Lewellyn (former president of the International Association for Business and Society), and Davenport (vice president of change and process management, First Data Corporation) argue that as globalization progresses, it is inevitable that businesses themselves will "lead the way to a new negotiated order, a widely accepted set of standards on human rights, labor conditions, the environment, corruption, and economic development." This global business citizenship, they say, is the path to sustainable capitalism, bringing innovation and wealth creation to all.
They conclude that while negotiated order is not a new development in business, it is important and deserves greater emphasis in the literature.
Most of this work has its theoretical underpinnings on Strauss' negotiated order perspective (see Maines, 1982; Strauss 1978; Strauss, Bucher, Ehrlich, & Satshim, 1963).
Discourse analysis of a meeting among these three organizations supported negotiated order theory, which suggests organizations with different cultures find it difficult to achieve a negotiated order because they will at times fail to share the symbolic meaning of the common terms they use.
The discourse analysis during the meeting was guided by three theoretical bodies of literature: negotiated order theory, organizational culture, and interactive sociolinguistics.
As in his previous works, Gary Alan Fine subscribes to the notion of social reality as negotiated order, a theoretical perspective that conceptualizes social reality as a product of a continual process of negotiation.
She uses negotiated order theory as a foundation to explore the inter-relationship between organizational, ecological, and criminological factors and their influence on police patrol practices at the precinct level.