NEG

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NEG

On drawings, abbr. for “negative.”
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Accordingly, we are interested exploring the influence of personal NEGs even further, since SRFEs, like many SMEs, often have a mix of economic and non-economic goals, and since their owners have a strong influence in shaping the strategy and behaviour of their enterprise.
After activation, gases will be removed from the vessel by reaction on the NEGs surface until enough gas is reacted to once again "skin over" the surface.
* NEGOTIATED RULEMAKING (REG NEG) a process that brings together representatives of various interest groups and a federal agency to negotiate the text oif a proposed rule and reach consensus (Source www.epa.gov/ooaujeag/stakeholders/factsrn.htm.)
The conventional rule making mean personal impact score does not change, since there are no EPA respondents; the reg neg mean personal impact score rises to 5.5 (p [is less than] .09), which shows that non-EPA respondents feel they have less total personal impact in a reg neg than in a conventional rule, which is not what one would expect if EPA is abrogating its responsibility in reg negs.
(16) Giulio Busini to Belisario Vinta, 16 April 1585, Negs. Tosc., IV, 563.
"If the cost was low enough, consumers might consider taking their pictures and leaving them on the card--the equivalent of digital negs."
* The abused negs of contempo Mexican classics like Alejandro Jodorowsky's "El Topo" (1969), Paul Leduc's "Reed: Insurgent Mexico" (1970) and several pics by Arturo Ripstein all await restoration.
This parameter is particularly important for NEGs, which operate as bulk getters.
You get a choice of three print shapes and a sheet of mini pix with the negs so that you can see them clearly for re-prints.
By pumping gases vacuum pumps miss, non-evaporable getters (NEGs) increase vacuum cleanliness and speed pumping overall.
Script is based on a novel by Steve Szilagyi, which in turn was based on the true incident known as the Cottingley Fairies, in which two Yorkshire girls claimed they had played with and photographed fairies in their garden (The same event is treated in Charles Sturridge's "Fairy Tale: A True Story.") Expert analysis of the negs failed to puncture their claims, and even Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle became convinced - much to his embarrassment when the two women later admitted it was a hoax.