neighbor


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neighbor

[′nā·bər]
(crystallography)
One of a pair of atoms or ions in a crystal which are close enough to each other for their interaction to be of significance in the physical problem being studied.
References in classic literature ?
How shall he ever know well that he is and does as an officer of the government, or as a man, until he is obliged to consider whether he will treat me, his neighbor, for whom he has respect, as a neighbor and well-disposed man, or as a maniac and disturber of the peace, and see if he can get over this obstruction to his neighborlines without a ruder and more impetuous thought or speech corresponding with his action.
Give me for my friends and neighbors wild men, not tame ones.
I went, along with a good many of my neighbors, and it was a sight to see, I can tell you.
Finally it occurred to them that their naked skin represented flesh-colored "tights" very fairly; so they drew a ring in the sand and had a circus -- with three clowns in it, for none would yield this proudest post to his neighbor.
And the neighbors talk about it, and lay all the blame on your uncle, of course, because he's a preacher and hain't got any business to quarrel.
Clare's worst side was his outside" -- but in this expression of opinion he stood alone among his neighbors.
But, never mind, he is a neighbor who has done us a service on a time, so he's welcome.
Still, Ernest's neighbor was thrusting his elbow into his side, and pressing him for an answer.
With the exception of Gisquette and Liénarde, who turned round from time to time when Gringoire plucked them by the sleeve; with the exception of the big, patient neighbor, no one listened, no one looked at the poor, deserted morality full face.
He told him that he should try to do nothing to stain the whiteness of that apron, which symbolized strength and purity; then of the unexplained trowel, he told him to toil with it to cleanse his own heart from vice, and indulgently to smooth with it the heart of his neighbor.
And, lastly, he inveighed against Minerva because she had not contrived iron wheels in the foundation of her house, so its inhabitants might more easily remove if a neighbor proved unpleasant.
When I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only.