nemoral


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nemoral

[′nem·rəl]
(ecology)
Pertaining to or inhabiting a grove or wooded area.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oak forests of the warm-temperate regions in the nemoral zone of Central and Southern Europe and relic supramediterranean firpine and oak forests of the Mediterranean Holotypus: Paeonio atlanticae-Cedrion atlanticae Barbero, Quezel & Rivas-Martinez ex Quezel & Barbero 1989 (assigned by Quezel & Barbero, 1989: 99)
The observed incidences in the nemoral, boreo-nemoral, and combined boreal and alpine regions were 0.02, 0.80, and 4.61 cases/100,000 persons/ year, respectively.
Nemoral species, including seedlings of woody species, are also observed in the meadow herbage, while boreal species are extremely rare.
The longitudinal width of the range of the circum-Holarctic species restricted to boreal or hypoarctic zones is slightly wider than that of species occurring in the nemoral zone (Figs.
Read (1983, 1986, 1991) proposed a model to describe and explain interrelations between soil pH, humus type, nitrogen mineralization pattern, and the dominance of plants with certain types of mycorrhizae in ecosystems ranging from tundra through boreal and nemoral forests to steppes.
310, estrato nemoral de bosque caducifolio dominado por Corylus avellana y Quercur robur (Rusco-Quercetum roboris subass.
OBERDORFER & al., 1967; MUCINA, 1993: 260; THEURILLAT & al., 1995; VALACHOVIE & al., 1995)--the home of the high-altitude chasmophytic vegetation on siliceous substrates in cool-temperate (nemoral) and boreal Europe.
Nemoral species associated with deciduous forests account for 18.9%, while boreal (taiga) species account for 12.2%; other species grow in the forests of various types.
With a distribution of this kind, it is understandable that there are nemoral (woodland) species associated with the rain forests, such as the Chilean firebush (Embothrium coccineum), that grow in the so-called Valdivian forests, and the well-known Asiatic and Australian genus Grevillea.