Neo-Impressionism

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Neo-Impressionism

 

an art trend that originated around 1885 in France, where its principal representatives were G. Seurat and P. Signac. Neo-impressionism spread to Belgium (T. van Rysselberghe), Italy (G. Segantini), and other countries. In developing the principles of late impressionism, which was marked by an intensified interest in optic phenomena, the neo-impressionists sought to apply the latest discoveries in optics to art. They methodically broke down complex color tones into pure colors. Seeking to overcome the haphazard and fragmentary nature of impressionist compositions, the neo-impressionists resorted to decorative, two-dimensional compositional solutions. The cerebral method of neo-impressionism often led to the predominance of cold intellectualism and to a dry abstractness of images.

REFERENCES

Signac, P. Ot Ezh. Delakrua k neoimpressionizmu, Moscow, 1913.
Rewald, J. Postimpressionism. Leningrad-Moscow, 1962. (Translated from English.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Making art more "scientific" and systematized is a recurring theme, even an obsession, for both the neo-impressionists and the constructivists.
The Neo-Impressionist project that Signac led by default after Seurat's death in 1891 oozed with modernity well into the twentieth century.
Surrendering often completely--if only briefly--to Neo-Impressionist practice seems to have cleared the air for all of them.
Georges Seurat and the neo-impressionists applied color systematically, according to current theories about optics.
In the interior, colors are brushed on in large blocks or wide sweeps of color, while the outside world is painted with short wavy lines or staccato brushstrokes, not unlike the studies of neo-impressionists painters.
Seurat and the neo-impressionists applied contemporary theories about optics and color in a rigorous way.
The pointillist and divisionist painters, or--to give them their historically accurate name coined in 1886 by the critic Felix Feneon--the neo-impressionists, are rarely given their full due when it comes to exhibitions.
A landscape by Klee, Rivage classique, a loose grid of small squares, is also close to abstraction, but is more directly reminiscent of the neo-impressionists, since 'optical mixing' of the colours is presumed to take place in the eyes of the viewer.
These paintings of distorted, flat images in violent colours started as a revolt against the strict methodism of the Neo-Impressionists like Seurat and Signac, and was so named by a disgruntled critic.