neoblast


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neoblast

[′nē·ə‚blast]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various undifferentiated cells in annelids which migrate to and proliferate at sites of repair and regeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though neoblasts have been the subject of scientific inquiry since the late 1800s, only in the last couple of decades have scientists been able to characterize this powerful cell population using functional assays and molecular techniques.
One feature that had long been used to distinguish neoblasts from other cells is a stem cell marker known as piwi-1, they decided to start there.
By homology, we believe that the upregulation of IL-1-like molecules in the hyperplasic ovary may induce the proliferation of neoblasts and their differentiation in oogonia, but may inhibit their maturation, causing the pathology of infertility.
Control animals show presence of [CD133.sup.+] cells in the periphery of the seminiferous tubule that probably correspond to neoblasts; in treated group the presence of [CD133.sup.+] cells is seen inside the seminiferous tubule, which might correspond to a proliferative response against oxidative stress caused by cypermethrin.
Neoblasts or undifferentiated cells may be multipotent stem cells and express the CD133 protein, the potential to differentiate into somatic or germ cells depending on whether microenvironmental conditions are favorable or not (Onal et al., 2012).
mediterranea to radiation, which killed the worms' neoblasts while leaving other types of cells unharmed.
Sanchez' colleague Phillip Newmark has kept planarian neoblasts alive in petri dishes for several weeks, an advance the researchers hope will allow them to genetically alter the animals.
Using complementary methods, Reddien and graduate students Dan Wagner and Irving Wang demonstrated that adult planarians not only possess pluripotent stem cells known as clonogenic neoblasts (cNeoblasts), a single such cell is capable of regenerating an entire animal.
By labeling cells for a gene expressed only in neoblasts, Wagner observed that these individual surviving cNeoblasts divided to form large colonies of cells.
They also knew that in uninjured planarians, neoblasts maintain tissues that undergo normal wear and tear over the worm's lifetime.
Following this hunch, and using what they knew about planarian neoblasts, post-doctoral fellow Jim Collins, Newmark, and their colleagues hunted for similar cells in Schistosoma mansoni, the most widespread species of human-infecting schistosomes.
Differences in mortality could be due to fragment size (e.g., energy reserves or number of neoblasts available) or lack of a mouth.